Four O'Clocks

Hi, I've started a bunch of Park's "Broken Color" variety and have noticed that the foliage is different on some of them. Some are all green and some have pinkish undersides to the leaves. Can I draw any conclusions about the colors of the flowers based on these differences?
Last year I only had one plant (from a solid variety). The foliage was plain green and the flowers were pale yellow. This year I'm interested in the multicolored flowers of the Broken Colors variety but I've read here that many of the seeds produce solid colored flowers.
Thanks.
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These plants are like weeds once they get a foothold. We've been ripping them out of one flowerbed for years now. Each generation gets taller and weedier and uglier.
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On Mon, 30 Apr 2007 17:22:26 -0500, "Manelli Family"

Down here they not only reseed, but also set bulbs and I love and still grow them. I don't have the fractured forms, but I love the white and there is a variety I tried this year called 'Butter and Cream' with very pale colors, so named.
They are very easy to pull after a good soaking rain, and I do pull them as they are plentiful, but the provide a ton of nectar to hummingbirds and insects that I love them.
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Manelli Family wrote:

I have to agree that Four O'Clocks are more like weeks here than a wanted flower. Me and my two neighbors have problems all season with them. It seems the more you pull, the more that popup. And they popup everywhere. Today, I spent over an hour pulling them from various flower beds.
--
Bill R. (Ohio Valley, U.S.A)

Gardening for over 40 years
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I appreciate the input on the weediness of the plant. Here in zone 6 I don't believe the tubers survive the winter and whether any of last year's seeds germinate remains to be seen. Actually I collected most of the seeds so there shouldn't be too many anyway.
Can anyone answer my original question about foliage color vs. flower color?
Doug
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I have never seen the foliage any color other than green, but with sports, which I believe the fractured colors come from, may have a hue of red to the foliage. That WAS your original question, right? If not, please ask it again.
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Yes, that was my original question.
The undersides of the leaves and the stems have a reddish tinge to them. Not enough to add interest but noticeable. Maybe it will be more pronounced when they're planted out in full sun. I'll plant both types and post the outcome on this board.
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This may or may not be the reason for the reddish tinge, but in nature where plants live under a high forest canopy will have dark undersides to absorb as much light as possible. Rex begonia is an example of one plant which has a very deep red underside for many varieties. So, these four o'clocks may be somewhat more tolerant of more shade than others.
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Exactly! I too spent over an hour the other day removing their seedlings *AGAIN* from among the iris plants. They would choke and shade out the iris bed given the chance. I'm sorry I ever planted the blasted things.

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I have the "broken color" variety, and I never noticed the foliage, but I admit to not paying attention. Last year I had about 6 different types - white, yellow, magenta, and 3 or 4 multicolored. All seemed to have the same medium green foliage. I have a packet of broken colors seeds on my desk - can't wait to plant them :)

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Four-O-Clocks are a lovely mass planting around a tree or against some other feature. They bring butterflys and humming birds and also have a delightful perfume which you can notice in a fair size planting. All plants are weeds if they grow where you do not want them but these plants can be transplanted easily and you can also control them by picking the seeds as you suggested. Plants with pigmented flowers have the same pigment in the whole plant and you can be sure the ones with purple leaves will have darker flowers although, in the broken colors they still may be veri-colored. If you grow the saved seed you may need to nick or scarrify it and soak it before planting. Have fun and be assured, most people who see your four-o-clocks will love them.
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my favourite four o'clocks are friday afternoons & off to the pub, especially when Barry shouts the first round.
rob
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