Four o clocks

I dug up some Four o clocks and moved them. They were at least 3 feet tall, and the root (rhizome, corm??) was good sized. (at least as big as a woman's fist) Of course the Four o clocks do not look happy in their new spot. Very droopy and wilted looking. It's been a week since I transplanted them. I am in South Louisiana, below New Orleans. If they don't perk up, maybe just leave them in the ground and they will catch up next season? I did a Google search and the only transplant information that I could find was on seedlings. Perry
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When I move mine, I cut the top off just above ground level and once the tuber is in the ground I put down a good amount of steer manure and a slow deep soaking of water. They come back after awhile.

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I have tried transplanting large four o'clocks many times, sometimes cutting them back and sometimes not, and usually the ones that are cut back recover faster and grow better than the ones not cut back.. Cut the large stems back to a few inches above ground level, mulch, and keep them well watered.

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Four o'clocks are not hardy perennials in my area, but one year a chain store was selling the tubers in bags, along with bleeding hearts, daylilies, and other tuberous rooted plants. All of the four-o-clocks that I bought there survived the bagging and storage process and bloomed beautifully for me that year. I'd guess that like most tuberous perennials, they'd be happiest if transplanted while dormant - meaning late fall or early spring - but that root is also a storage organ, so there's lots of "stuff" in there ready to make new growth whenever. I'd agree with the posters who suggested cutting back the top foliage.

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Cutting them back was what I had in mind. I agree with the tuber being a fleshy storage and even if they don't do great this year, they'll rest up and do fine next. Thanks. Perry

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