Forcing Amaryllis Bulk in Water?

Hi,
I am completely new to gardening and amaryllis, so please my question might be naive for most of you here. I have been given this amaryllis, a glass container, and some polished river rocks by my friend. I was told to put the river rocks in the glass and the amaryllis bulk on top of the rocks, then put water in to emerge about 1/4 of the bulk in water. I guess that's all that I need to do and expect the amaryllis to grow.
As I said, I am bland new to planting any plant, and I want to make sure I am doing it right. I would really appeciate if anyone can tell me if I am doing everything necessary. Thanks a lot!
Mike
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On 2005-12-15 19:11:00 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com said:

I would only put in enough water to cover the roots, NOT the bulb itself. It will most likely rot if it sat in water.
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You can use that method if you only want to enjoy the amaryllis one year, although I agree that the water should be only towards the bottom of the bulb, not towards the top. But why not force it in a way that will allow you to enjoy it for several years? Put some potting soil with a little fertilizer in that vase/pot and set the amaryllis in it so that the top 1/3 of the bulb is sticking out of the soil. Moisten the soil a bit if nothing is coming out of the bulb yet, and leave it be until you see foliage emerging. If foliage or bloom stalk is already emerging, water more thoroughly , about once a week. When the bulb has finished blooming, put the pot in a sunny window where the leaves can get good light on them, and once frost is over, set the pot outside in part shade , somewhere that the sprinkler reaches. Leave them there until fall and the first frosts. Let them dry out a bit until the foliage yellows. Let them sit in the pot in a cool dark place for 6 weeks or so, then take them out into a warmer area, moisten the soil again, or repot, and you'll have blooms again next year.

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presley wrote:

No, don't force the bulb to go dormant. In nature, amaryllis (Hippeastrum) is evergreen. Indoors, keep the pot near a window where it will get strong INDIRECT light (not direct sun). Keep it slightly moist so that it keeps growing through the winter.
In my garden, amaryllis sometimes goes dormant by itself and sometimes does not. If it does not, then it may bloom two or even three times in one year.
See my <http://www.rossde.com/garden/garden_hippeastrum.html .
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Amaryllis are top-heavy and "tippy" when in full bloom; river rocks aren't going to help the situation, alas. Me, myself and I, I prefer plain old potting soil with some extra sand for bulb forcing and a drained plastic or (my favorite) clay pot -- drains well enough that bulbs don't rot, heavy enough that the pots don't tip, and much less tricky to water properly. Plant so that about 1/4 of the bulb is out of the soil. Put the drained pot in a decorative "cache pot" for display. Don't let the pot sit in water, or you may get root or bulb rot started. Toss the polished rocks on top of the soil for decoration if you like.
Kay
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