Emerald Green Arborvitae

I live in New York and I just bought 8 Emerald Green Arborvitaes to plant on the South side of my house. I was wondering if someone can tell me and let me know the best way to plant them. It indicates that they grow to 15 ft and 3 feet wide but doesn't give much more information. Is there a special type of soil that would be best??????? I live near the beach and was wondering if there is anything special I should do. Any help on planting these would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks in advance.
Newbie at planting.
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Arborvitae can be salt intolerant so if "by the beech" you mean you're planting them in the way of salt air spray, you may have trouble with them. But if it's a freshwater beech, or if others in your neighborhood have grown arborvitae successfully, probably it'll be okay.
Sizes given on nursery tags are generally the ten-year size, not necessarily the maximum size, though 'Smaragd' aka 'Emerald Green' is one of the smaller upright arborvitaes.
Except for not liking salty soils near oceans or bays, they are not fussy about their soil. To get them started you should dig them holes much larger than the rootballs (at least three times wider than each rootball, more if your digging energy holds out) & mix into all that soil a third again as much organic compost, & don't tamp the soil too tight when done. They should be planted slightly higher than the undug surrounding soil, which the addition of the compost will effect.
They want full sun, excellent drainage, & for the first couple years they should not experience any droughtiness whatsoever, so you'll need to get some water out to them -- when well-rooted & established they can survive being ignored though 'Smaragd/Emerald Green' is never terribly drought tolerant.
If you don't see any healthy old arborvitae in your immediate area, that could well mean salt does them in. If so, it might not be too late to return them to the nursery & use the credit to get salt-tolerant trees; it'll save some disappointment. There are upright Chinese juniper cultivars that would fit most of the criteria that must've led you to an arborvitae, but with salt tolerance into the bargain. But the most salt-tolerant trees tend not to be evergreens.
-paghat the ratgirl
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Hi paghat the ratgirl :), Thank you so much for taking the time to respond. I live about a 2 blocks off the beach. I have seen some in my area and one of my neighbors have them. So, hopefully they'll do OK. Your response is greatly appreciated. Thanks again.
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If you have deer, I wouldn't plant them. Just from experience in my yard. They practically ate them to the trunk.
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In addition to what Paghat said, I would just note that if you are in zone 5 in NY, they may be marginally hearty. They tend to turn bronze if the winter is too cold. I see people buying them by the cart load now at places like Costco because they are sold as a quick growing, nearly instant privacy screen that can grow about anywhere and are deer resistant. It seems that they either thrive or die a slow death. Do keep the receipt in a safe place if there is a guarantee. I see loads of dead arborvitae in the return section of garden centers and Costco.
As far as planting them, I wouldn't get carried away with amending the soil but do excavate a big hole. If they are going to be planted in a row, you might consider having someone excavate a trench. For eight plants, you will need a trench about 30 feet long and as deep as the rootball. That could be a lot of work unless you are blessed with excellent soil as opposed to heavy clay like I have.
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Thanks you all for taking the time to respond. They're planted but now I fear that they won't survive the Winter. I live in Long Island, New York. I do see some in the area that is doing fine. Is there something I can do before the winter to keep them going? Now I'm concerned.
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