Designing a Compost Bin

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Witrh 20-20 hindsight, I should have done just as you did, instead of buying the (supposedly discounted, but not very good) bins the City was offering. Even the previous bin, which had an outlet at the bottom, was not your Class A composter.
I am selling my Smith & Hawken bio-something composter and will in future rely on the City's 4x yearly free distribution of fine-ground compost. It will now be enriched w/table scraps since they have starting allowing/inviting us to add all table scraps -- including meat & other no-no''s -- to the garden waste bins.
May also cut back somewhat on growing food. In such a small household, with access to four (not cheap!) farmers markets and an organic co-op, it almost doesn't pay to grow -- except possibly for "spiritual" reasons.
HB
HB.
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On Tue, 21 Feb 2012 15:48:53 -0800 (PST), Higgs Boson

Inverting the contents.
The box type bins I've seen have an opening at the base you can shovel the bottommost compost out of - slide straight in, pull out (think pizza oven). if you really needed to rotate the compost in a bin, you could shovel about a third out from the bottom and drop it on top, and a week or two later, repeat the effort. This doesn't do a complete inversion, but is reasonable. There is no need to relocate the bin.
Rotating a 50 gallon drum on an axle is a LOT easier.

Well, I think there's two sorts of home composting : someone with a handful of garden clippings, plus the kitchen debris, and then someone with an acre+ of yard to maintain, with tree limbs, leaves, grass cuttings, and vegetable garden debris. The little composter can't keep up with ALL of that - but if you put certain debris in there, you can at least have a fast composter for some of your debris.

The composting operations at municipal facilities are dealing with such large volumes of compost that they've got no trouble maintaining a high breakdown temperature. They can probably handle a small quantity of meat in the compost bins without grief.

We've had green bind with the trash outfits for 2+ decades (the county where I used to live was a very early adopter of curbside recycling, not that reducing the landfil consumption rate meant that we'd pay any lower a trash bill). With the exception of brambles, and sometimes thorny citruses, I don't take any greenwaste to the landfill - all of that goes into the compost. If my inlaws need a hand pruning the garden, I haul my trailer over, we prune, and I load the stuff into my trailer and haul it over here (it's always too much to manage in their greenbin alone anyway) - hock it in the compost pile and let it do me some good.
But then, I picked up about 5 cubic yards of composted horse manure this past weekend (about 3400lbs I had to shovel out of my trailer in two trailerloads) and have an order in for 40 cubic yards (delivered by a semi trailer dumptruck with an extension trailer) of composted duck manure - my favourite garden amendment. I'm always working to add organic material to the garden to improve the tilth - it's not enough to compost everything on site, I need MORE. <g>
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***That was the case with my former composter; had an opening at the base. The one I am now decommissioning does not, so I call it a poor design.
[...snip....]
HB
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wrote:

Google for Kambha and dig around in the many articles such as here http://www.ecowalkthetalk.com/blog/2010/07/21/part-1-how-to-compost-at-home-using-container-pots / . Maybe consider making them out of mushroom materials such as here: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100727121933.htm or some other type resin or hypertufa like material.
There are enough tumblers which are way overpriced for any added benefits
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Let me add for those that like to read ahead, look at the part 2 here: http://www.ecowalkthetalk.com/blog/2010/07/24/part-2-how-to-compost-at-home-using-the-daily-dump /
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