delphiniums

hello, I have been trying to grow delphiniums from seed since early this spring. I bought seeds from a local hardware store. Both the Pacific Giants and the Connecticut yankees. I tried 2 different attemps to seed in my garden and 1 round in planters inside. Absolutely nothing germinated. I generally have no problem growing anything. Could the seeds be bad from the seed company or is there some secret that I am missing? thanks Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
My delphiniums germinated without much problem this spring, although I don't know what variety they are. May be bad seed.
--
Jacqueline
Carmichaels PA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I don't know the variety that I planted, either. But they germinated and a growing nicely.
Brigitte, in Zone 5 - SE Cornbraska
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Where are you located? Delphiniums dont *do* some parts of the country well.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
IMHO, Delphs germinate best after stratification, a period of cold. Sow them in the ground in fall with your own collected seed, or sow boughten seed in VERY EARLY spring without protection from frost-- flats, packs, or garden row ( your choice) exposed to cold ( deliberately meaning hard frost and freezing temperatures). If you raise veggies, plant Delphs with Peas and Onions, in the same cold conditions.
Colors tend to germinate sequentially, the original, homozygous deep Blue/purples first ( especially with your own, open pollinated, collected seed), Hybrid colors a few days to a few weeks to a year longer.
Seeded Deplhs ( still IMHO) do not respond to any coddling. They thrive best here in zone 5 ( a marginal 4) with benign neglect, and yes, I have had seed germinate a full year after planting.
Tough love.
Sue Western Maine
-- Breeze ( sue burnham)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A friend of mine has had the best luck germinating them in the refrigerator in a plastic bag with moist paper toweling around them. (I will doublecheck her method again). As soon as she sees roots and the start of leaves emerging from the seeds, she transplants them into small pots. So far, she has had dramatic results.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bill, I have tried to grow delphiniums for the past 3 years without success. A couple would germinate, but would be dead by the time to be planted. This year, one grew high enough during winter to be planted in spring, survived for a month only. So still no delphinium in my garden. I am successful with almost anything else. In May this year, I planted more than 500 plants (annuals and perennials), seeded during winter in the house. All are thriving. Franoise.
billq wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It might be that your climate is also not hospitable for delphiniums. Do other people in your area grow them?Where they are hardy and conditions are to their liking, delphiniums are easy to grow, although usually not long-lived. (This includes, surprisingly, large swaths of Alaska, so cold is obviously not an issue for them). If your climate is too humid, and has a lot of warm-to-hot summer nights, failure is almost certain. Also, slugs will find young delphiniums and chew them to the ground nightly, if given half a chance. Many people simply opt for buying an inexpensive pack of them in spring at the garden center.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I live in Canada where we have deep freeze in winter. I have seen delphiniums around here before. Next fall, I am going to seed some in the ground and see what will happen. If I fail, that will be it for delphinium. If they grow but are kill because of our hot summer, again, that will be it!!! Scabiosa is another flower that does not seem to like me. Franoise.
gregpresley wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (GrampysGurl) wrote:

Can't make single assessments for all scabious species. I find all that I've tried to be very easily grown, but not if the measure is their ability to perennialize for years. Some (such as S. atropurpurea, my favorite) really are biennials & will do super well for two consecutive summers, then they're done. Others like S. stellata often bloom themselves to death in two seasons but are wonderful for the time being. Others (such as S. columbaria) will perennialize but are shortlived even in the best case scenario & need to be restarted at intervals. The sturdiest perennial pincushion flower is probably S. caucasus, but even this tires after a very few years & needs to be dug up, the thick woodier parts of the root trimmed out of it during division, thus revitalized for a couple more years -- so few people bother to do this that it ends up being a poor plant after a very few splendid years.
As for delphiniums, some are likewise biennials or in cooler zones defacto annuals, & the hardiest that do perennialize nevertheless tire out after a very few years so could be considered shortlived or at least not long in their prime, & many varieties are so prone to tipping over they might as well die they're so annoying. A lovely substitute for them in cool temperate gardens is monkshood, many species of which live long lives & rarely need (& usually dislike) division.
-paghat the ratgirl
--
"Of what are you afraid, my child?" inquired the kindly teacher.
"Oh, sir! The flowers, they are wild," replied the timid creature.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

They don't like anyone lol. I treat them as an annual here. I put them in for the butterflies but never expect more then a sparse one year from them. Colleen Zone 5 CT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bill,

I guess this year is not really a delphinium year.... I've sown deep blue delphiniums early this year and till now only two plants appeared - both *pink*....
Strange, strange...
Gaby
--
Mrs. Gaby Chaudry
http://www.gaby.de/bilder /
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Cold stratification. Delphinium seeds will germinate better if chilled before planting. sed5555
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.