Compost bin design?

Page 2 of 3  

expounded:

My apologies to two year olds worldwide.......... In my defence, I did consider and reject referencing any rodentia, viperids, or parasitoids, however...... Poor things have it hard enough without being associated with a........... well, I'll just leave it at that.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I rather like the style of the dalek (Earth-Machine) http://www.composters.com/compost-bins/earth-machine_8_1.php just because I am a fan of Dr Who, but I have to admit that the first one Sheldon mentions - http://www.composters.com/compost-bins/soilmaker--soilsaver_17_1.php has a much longer warrenty.
Right now I have a poorly functioning pile out near my septic tank and mostly all it is doing is drying up in this hot summer. I will put my soilmaker/soilsaver, as it is called,right there where the ground is always a little warm. I would think that would help,especially in the winter since that area is the first to thaw, first to green up. Just as the saying goes, the grass truly is always greener over the septic tank.
Deb
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
thistletoes wrote:

Think carefully about where you locate it.
I keep mine near my vegetable garden:
http://i11.tinypic.com/67qs007.jpg
You can see where my composter was before I moved it, I wasn't able to mow in those corners when it was up against the fence:
http://i12.tinypic.com/66uv8na.jpg
Early yesterday morning I was awakened by horrific honking, the yearly departure powows have begun:
http://i9.tinypic.com/52z51si.jpg
I'll need to be more careful where I step:
http://i1.tinypic.com/4pvv9t3.jpg
That's it, fertilize my Crimson King Norway maple:
http://i16.tinypic.com/6cr8zsl.jpg
That's why it's called a *copper* leaf weeping beech:
http://i5.tinypic.com/66cca42.jpg
One of my girls is being a ham... that bright green thingie in my Jurassic meadow is a befiting dawn redwood:
http://i15.tinypic.com/54l61sp.jpg
Mighty handsome:
http://i10.tinypic.com/4hwmeiv.jpg
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

goose problem but we sure have the deer. Persistent beasts. I like the netting over top, too. This last summer we had such a scorcher that the plants - did actually get sun scald. I need to get some saran cloth or something to provide shade if we are going to continue global warming. The Soilsaver composters like yours are on the way - got a great deal on eBay. Thanks again Deb :-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
thistletoes wrote:

I'm glad you got good deal, how good a deal did you get on Ebay, I never would have though to look there for a composter, but then I've never bought anything from Ebay. Just figured I'd take a peek, found this, a great price, less than I paid more than ten years ago: http://tinyurl.com/32aasp
http://cgi.ebay.com/NEW-139-Soilsaver-Garden-Composter-Compost-Bin_W0QQitemZ110168387367QQihZ001QQcategoryZ75665QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem
When you set up your composter choose a level spot that's slightly pitched away (you don't want the composter set in a depression that can collect water) and check with a level that you set it plumb and check with a carpenter's square that all the corners are at 90deg... otherwise the lid won't fit well. Also find a relatively dry spot, not somewhere that stays kind of boggy when there's heavy precipitation, otherwise with winter snows and freezes the ground will be more likely to heave and skew your composter out of kilter, and then the lid won't fit. That's the main reason I moved my composter uphill a bit, there's a small seasonal stream that runs along that edge of my garden. The garden was set there because even in periods of drought I don't need to water... that ground can appear dry as desert but dig down six inches and it's moist.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The Soilsaver composters like yours are on the way -

I think you found the same ad. I paid $58 on eBay for the exact same item composters.com has for $99.50. Shipping was basically the same. I am thrilled. No, I would never have thought of eBay either, but lately have become creative in shopping online. Did you know you can get car parts on Amazon?
Deb
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
thistletoes wrote:

I'm begining to think you can buy anything on ebay, not just parts, but the entire vehicle. I think you can even find a mate, rent a date, you can find everything on ebay.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well, poor little Sheldon baby, I'll just tell you the story one more time then you really will have to lie down in your cot and take a nap.
Once upon a time, Joe, Janet, and various other grown-ups decided to look on the internet, at pictures of different kinds of compost bins, because we wanted to be sure we're all talking about the same thing; and we are. The End.
There now, that wasn't too hard to follow was it? It was? Poor baby. Never mind. Now, you just lie back and suck your thumb.We'll leave the light on so you won't be frightened.
Janet.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
whimpered from his cot

Sheldon owned. :-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have another question. I will buy the Soilmaker at http://www.composters.com/compost-bins/soilmaker--soilsaver_17_1.php that Sheldon recommended and I have a spot near my septic tank which will be great since it is a bit warmer in the winter. First to thaw, so as the saying goes, the grass is always greener over the septic tank. My question concerns some squash and tomato vines to compost, but we have no grinder or shredder. What would be a recommended way of composting those vines other than cutting into bite-size pieces? How small would we realistically need to cut them or do we need to cut them at all? Can we just just stuff them in the composter and let them cook? Please advise.
Deb :-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
contains these words:

Those vines might remain a bit "rope-ish", while other stuff around them composts easily. Dump them back into the composter. Or, get yourself a pair of scissors that'll make it easy to cut the vines. Joyce Chen kitchen scissors are good for this. The same thing is sold at garden centers for twice the price, labeled as florist's scissors.
By the way, I've found the compost mixing tool to be useful. Check the web site - should be twenty of thirty bucks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Oh dear, now I'm confused...
Should the pallet slats run vertical or horizontal?
:-)
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Diagonal, for best wind resistance in flight.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snotbottom wrote:

Yes. HTH :-)
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You really need to bone up on composting. I had a triple bin above ground composter that worked just fine. No smell, no slime, temps up to 160+F during active composting with earthworms and other assorted munchy organisms after cool down, too.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sheldon's just being weird. (So what's new?)
This is what normal people envision when they think of above-ground composters: http://www.composters.com/compost-bins/garden-estate-bin_16_1.php and http://www.composters.com/compost-bins/soilmaker--soilsaver_17_1.php and http://www.composters.com/compost-bins/bio-stack-bin_91_1.php and http://www.composters.com/compost-bins/presto-hoop-companion_15_1.php etc etc.....
Sheldon's pretending that above ground composters all look like this or similar. No soil contact: http://www.composters.com/compost-tumblers/original-compost-tumbler_35_2.php
Once our definitions match, there will be no further problems with this discussion.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Actually by your own link there is no such nomenclature as "above ground" composter... again, for the THICK HEADED, this thread evolved into calling a tumbler type composter an above ground composter.
You're weird (actrually you're an ignoranus), in that you and your cohorts are pretending to be erudite while in fact you're functionally illiterate.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I don't care what anyone else calls these composters. The only correct definitions are mine, and there is no possible way to debate that absolute truth.
Get used to it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The thing I don't understand (among others) is that my compost heap just disappears into the soil. It is only 1 1/2 feet tall and I never reach the top of it with my kitchen scraps. ?? I think I need to take my kitchen scraps up to the garden this winter and cut out the middle man.
--
FB - FFF

Billy

Get up, stand up, stand up for yor rights.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In article <wildbilly-2EEDCF.21571105092007@c-61-68-245-

It doesn't disappear into the soil below. It just shlumps down, with the weight and the moisture.
When I dump stuff in, there is a lot of air inside the volume - it's fluffy. Then, while it sits and decays, it compacts downward due to weight/gravity, and the basic space-efficiency of smaller particles.
Also, the moisture level can go to a sort of equilibrium, towards a more efficient (smaller volume) level. With any excess hopefully draining into the soil below. Although you must be careful to keep a reasonable (not too soggy, not too dry) amount of moisture going in. Including into a full bin that you are allowing to sit without additions.
Think of a mason jar, full of marbles. There will be a lot of air space. But, if the marbles gradually turned to sand, the contents would be more efficient, and would appear to be smaller.
--
Get Credit Where Credit Is Due
http://www.cardreport.com /
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.