Can I freeze Zukes?

Hi All,
I may be getting way ahead of myself -- black thumb and all -- but if I happen to actually grow more zukes that my wife and I can eat, can I chop them up, toss them in a zip lock bag, and freeze them for the winter (when I am relegated to frozen vegi's anyway)?
Many thanks, -T
Talk about run on sentences!
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Todd wrote:

I suggest cooking them, then freezing the cooked item, zuck bread, zuck stewps.
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Todd said:

Only if you plan to add them to soups or stews. They will pretty much be mush.
They can also be sliced thin to dry, in which case they can be eaten like veggie chips. Or slicea little thicker and dry, and you get something which will be a little toothier then frozen zukes when soaked and cooked (or added to soups and stews).
--
Pat in Plymouth MI

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wrote:

Summer squash freezes well, it's in frozen packages of California Blend at the market... only I strongly suggest freezing it in a cooked dish containing zukes, as in baked products and/or stewps... and give the overage away... I see no point in filling a freezer with bags of vegetables that in all likelyhood will sit for years and eventually and up as compost. A zuke cake or muffins will almost always get eaten, so will a stewp. If you have a glut of zukes I recommend grilling them, they will go fast; slice lengthwise, brush with olive oil, season, and grill, yummy. Larger ones can be sliced into rounds, 1/2" thk.
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On 08/18/2014 07:53 AM, Brooklyn1 wrote:

Hi Pat and Brooklyn1,
Thank you!
-T
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Todd wrote:

Eat the small ones. Shred the giant ones and freeze them for baking with in winter, because the big tough ones freeze a lot better.
If you freeze the tender ones, they have a nasty watery texture when thawed -- but can still be used if you blenderize them or cook them to pieces.
Bob
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On 08/18/2014 12:29 PM, zxcvbob wrote:

Confused. Freeze them in water or thaw them and cook them in water?

Thank you!
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Todd wrote:

Shred the big overgrown zukes and freeze them in freezer bags w/o any water. Thaw and use it zucchini bread, or however else you want to cook it.
I've been cooking cubed zucchini slowly with a little oil, butter, and dehydrated onion until all the excess water is boiled off (it takes a long time because it just keeps giving off more and more water as it cooks) The resulting mush is greatly reduced in volume, tastes good, and it *might* actually freeze okay -- I haven't tried freezing it.
Bob
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On 08/17/2014 02:30 PM, Todd wrote:

Found this great article:
http://www.marksdailyapple.com/how-to-freeze-fruits-vegetables/
Have only skimmed it so far. Must read it more closely.
-T
By the way, I am "Primal" not "Paloe", although they are very similar and I don't obsess on it.
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On 08/20/2014 03:42 PM, Todd wrote:

Any thoughts on blanching them first?
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