broadcast spreader repair

End of last fall season I acquired a used Scotts broadcast spreader (at the curb on trash day). The rotating mechanism is corroded and hard to turn. Yesterday I decided it's time to work on it and see if I can get it to working condition again. I lubed all rotating joints and the gear. It's at the point where I think the problem is at the hopper where the driveshaft and the plastic meet and penetrating oil can't (or hasn't) get in there. I gave it a brief try but didn't want to force anything. Looks like there is a rolled pin and a collar with a set screw. I lightly punched the pin and tried to unscrew the set screw but neither budged. Anyone even taken this thing apart?
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On Thu, 3 Apr 2008 09:04:57 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net wrote:

Give it a spray of WD-40. If that doesn't work it's not worth fixing and it's time to take it back to the curb! Spreaders need to be washed and rinsed after each use else the metal parts will quickly corrode.
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Already put plenty of lubricating oil (machine oil) which is supposed to have water displacing (WD) properties, but it's just not working itself down the shaft. I guess you're right, back to the curb it goes.

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On Thu, 3 Apr 2008 17:04:17 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net wrote:

Heh heh.....don't you just hate that (been there, done that... often), when trash turns to treasure and back again.
Charlie
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Hmm, that's an interesting idea. Never thought of using actual sand to sand parts, only sand paper. But sounds like no one has tried to take one apart, which would be my preferred way of restoring it. It's not even about the money of buy a new one, I just thought I'd be doing some good by reusing someone else's junk if it's just a matter of some elbow grease.

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snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net wrote:

Put some Liquid Wrench on the set screw and let it sit overnight, then clean out the hole (I'm asuming it's an Allen or Philips) as best you can (a Q-tip and some lacquer thinner would help here) so the screwdriver doesn't slip on the Liquid Wrench, then see if the set screw comes out. If it does then you can disassemble the thing and clean and lube it properly. If in the course of it you bugger up the set screw beyond economical repair then what have you lost, really?

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--John
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