Blueberries leaf/bud differently

Amici -
I put in two blueberry bushes last year. Now they are moving into Spring. They are in large pots, getting plenty of sun & the right amount of water, receiving light monthly applications of appropriate fertilizer.
O'Neal is blossoming up a storm but just starting to leaf out, where as Bountiful Blue is all leafed out, but zip buds.
Was it anything I did/didn't do? Do I need to jog Bountiful Blue a little? With more fertilizer, or?
Why would two varieties act so differently?
This is So Calif coastal.
Tx
HB
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Higgs Boson wrote:

genetics
D
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wrote:

It's also important to acertain that with only two plants that they are recommended pollenators for each other, not all blueberries pollenate all other blueberries... and they need to be in flower at the same time... I would have a minimum of three different type of blueberries and at least three of each, otherwise the crop (if there is any) will be so small as to not make it worthwhile. Also I don't consider blueberry bushes in pots planted. And in pots with all the chemicals one is likely to apply the build up can be so great that the soil won't have a chance to purge and the plant will likely die. I would definitely get those blueberry plants into the ground, and with fertilizers less is more... folks tend to forget (if they ever knew) that green plants receive most of their energy via photosynthesis. So long as the soil is of reasonable quality, is within the range of proper Ph, and they are watered adequately/regularly it's really not necessesary to fertilize blueberries planted in the ground. I have a dozen blueberry bushes (four types, three of each) planted in the ground, I never fertilize and they produce well... the only problem is birds, blueberries need to be netted or it's all for nought.
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Thanks, Wenchie darlin'. My post was more an "inquiring minds" type of question. I was speculating on the evolutionary survival value of early leafing as opposed to early budding. Also, ISTR that the nursery told me that these plants don't need cross-pollination? What say you?
HB
Cross pollination is not required, but it does lead to a more bountiful crop. There are more than 40 species of Vaccinium native to North America. At least 5 or so are commonly available as nursery stock. It's possible you have two different species.
Steve
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wrote:

Same here... I think I'm on the other end of Greene County from you... got a good 10" of the white stuff. I don't expect any green on my blueberries until like late April-early May. Reached 61º today, snow is melting fast... a very unseasonably warm winter, like no winter at all.
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On Mar 3, 1:38 pm, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

It took YEARS -- DECADES! -- for the blueberry folks to develop cultivars that could handle our mild climate (So Calif coastal). Hallelujah! (wipes away drool...)
HB
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