Black-eyed Susan seeds

All my B.E.S. flowers are starting to fade and I was wondering - if I scattered the seeds in and around a vacant lot they would produce new plants there in the spring? Or should I bring the seeds inside, store for the winter and plant them in the spring?
TIA
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Break the seeds up and sprinkle them out there. They multiply rather readily from seed on their own.
On 12 Oct 2003 14:11:04 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (HA HA Budys Here) opined:

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Hi,
Is it good for any rudbeckia? I have some Toto, which are not perennials here.
I had 2 new rudbeckias this year. I think they both are perennials here. They are Marmalade and Prairie Sun Rise.
Franoise.
animaux wrote:

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Rudbeckia hirta has many cultivars. Most of them require a warm soil to germinate. In my USDA Zone 8b, these are perennial. Since I don't know where you are located, I would say to germinate these and expecting the same plant may not be realistic. They may not come true from seed of YOUR production. Seed companies have very rigidly timed crops, which are pollinated at certain times, and it's all very scientific to come up with viable, reliable to the cultivar, seed.
I would collect the seeds, hold them in a paper bag, mark the bag, give them about a month of refrigeration in your fridge and plant them in pots in early spring. Early spring in Texas is February. You may have other climate situations.
Key thing is, Rudbeckia hirta, the mother of all Rudbeckia needs warm soil to germinate, and by warm I mean about 70-75 degrees F.
Victoria

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I live in Canada Zone 5 (different from U.S. zone 5). I have some rudbekias, which are perennials. I do not know their name. Two years ago I ordered some Totos, which were advertised at the time as perennials. In the 2003 catalogue, they were sold as annuals. They died in winter and did not come back this spring. Last winter I planted seed in the house from 2 other types: Marmalade and Prairie Sun Rise. The Prairie Sun Rise was advertised as a perennial.
I wondered if I could spread the seeds of one type or two of rudbekia. From your answer, I will have to plant them in the house again next winter. But I may still try to spread seeds since I would not lose anything by trying. Maybe one of them is a perennial.
Thank you for your answer.
Franoise.
animaux wrote:

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someone gave me seeds (flower heads) last fall. I brought the seed heads inside, kept them dry and tossed them out in mid-late April. They germinated and started blooming in August. I'm pretty sure they will be perennial here, but I'm not sure how long-lived. I'm in zone 5/6
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That's what I'd do. The seeds outside will not germinate till the soil warms up. That's all I meant. There should be plenty of seed on each plant.
Victoria

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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (HA HA Budys Here) wrote in message

Your zone?
I'm in zone 5. I have a black eyed susan in a corner a few years ago. It scattered its seeds all over my garden by itself. Now I have black eyed susan everywhere in my garden. They sprout out like weeds in the early summer.
You should be OK if you scatter the seeds now. You can also split your plant and transplant them where you want. It actually help the old plant to revive. The flowers from the seeds are small like daisy in the first year. The second year and on, they'll be tall and big like sun flowers, which I like better than the sorry looking small ones.
They're easy to take care. They're considered wildflowers. you can't kill them unless you give them too much water.
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I'm expecting this one will be easy for folks, but it hasn't been for me. This wildflower:
http://www.paghat.com/images/sweetsomething_aug.jpg
has been blooming all summer & still blooming now. It popped up in a roadside sungarden as a volunteer, very tiny last year, a good-sized clump this year. It's less than two feet tall. The clusters of blooms add up at biggeset to the size of a fist.
I remember when I was a child this very flower grew around a stump with yarrows on my great-gram's farm & the grandkids would pick them & gramma taught us how to dry flowers using this thing. But I can't for the life of me remember what she called them.
-paghat the ratgirl
--
"Of what are you afraid, my child?" inquired the kindly teacher.
"Oh, sir! The flowers, they are wild," replied the timid creature.
  Click to see the full signature.
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Oh my god - I had the same thing come up in my garden this year I presume from the wild flower packet I threw around - I would love to know what it is as well. It is definitely an everlasting but blasted if I could figure out what kind!!

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Can't remember the name, it is an everlasting and used in dried flower arrangements. I used to have this up North.

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Gnaphalium obtusifolium, commonly called "rabbit tobacco". It is also one of the plants commonly called "everlasting" and used in dried flower arrangements.

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Thanks! That put me on the right track at least, & I was able to start on the right page of the natives guide to figure this out. Gnapalium obtusifolium has slightly pointed flowers making up a looser raceme & is native of Eastern N.A. This one appears to be Pseudognaphalium macounii with flat-topped barrel shaped flowers in a tighter bunch, & native of right here in the Northwest (as well as all of Canada & most of the northern US). My great-gran growing it around a stump in a meadow along with yarrows seems to have been a common thing in times past, both plants needing no attention & purportedly having medicinal values.
-paghat the ratgirl

--
"Of what are you afraid, my child?" inquired the kindly teacher.
"Oh, sir! The flowers, they are wild," replied the timid creature.
  Click to see the full signature.
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