Bad Jalapeno vairety- Jalapa

I bought pepper plants late this year and I didn't pay attention. I bought a variety called "Jalapa" which is a little smaller than I like. More importantly they don't turn red, they just rot on the plant. I've thrown away about 15 peppers that after cracklin developed rot points--often softening at the tip and dripping the insides out as soggy ooze. NOrmally I leave peppers on the plant till I use them--always harvesting reds (or with jalapeno crackled) first cause they are them most mature. I can't do that with this variety! They rot instead. When turning that brown color as they transition from green to red that meant they are already bad!
What a disastrous variety! Live and learn
DiGiTAL ViNYL (no email) Zone 6b/7, Westchester Co, NY, <1 mile off L.I.Sound 2nd year gardener http://photos.yahoo.com/ph/royalfrazier /
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Blossom end rot results from drought and acid soils. Blossom-end rot is a common problem that causes a brown to black sunken rot at the blossom end of the fruit. It is caused by drought, uneven water availability, or pruning roots through improper cultivation. Blossom-end rot is not caused by a parasitic organism but is a physiologic disorder associated with a low concentration of calcium in the fruit. Calcium is required in relatively large concentrations for normal cell growth. When a rapidly growing fruit is deprived of necessary calcium, the tissues break down, leaving the characteristic dry, sunken lesion at the blossom end. Blossom-end rot is induced when demand for calcium exceeds supply. This may result from low calcium levels or high amounts of competitive cations in the soil, drought stress, or excessive soil moisture fluctuations which reduce uptake and movement of calcium into the plant, or rapid, vegetative growth due to excessive nitrogen fertilization. Even though it affects many different varieties of peppers, blossom-end rot is more severe on some varieties of peppers than on others. Remove infected fruits and throw them away. Irrigation and mulching can help to prevent blossom-end rot. Though the condition is caused by a calcium deficiency in the affected fruit tissue, addition of calcium to the soil seldom alters the condition. The problem is one of calcium mobility in the plant, not lack of calcium in the soil. Many farmers 'foliar feed' to apply calcium to prevent blossom end rot. Keep the watering regular to avoid alternating wet and drought. Fluctuating moisture levels will cause wilt and blossom end rot.
What to do to prevent it:
Maintain the soil pH around 6.5. Liming will supply calcium and will increase the ratio of calcium ions to other competitive ions in the soil.
Use nitrate nitrogen as the fertilizer nitrogen source. Ammoniacal nitrogen may increase blossom-end rot as excess ammonium ions reduce calcium uptake. Avoid over-fertilization as side dressings during early fruiting, especially with ammoniacal forms of nitrogen.
Avoid drought stress and wide fluctuations in soil moisture by using mulches and/or irrigation. Plants generally need about one inch of moisture per week from rain or irrigation for proper growth and development.
Avoid cultivating near the roots. Mulch rather than cultivate to prevent weeds.
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DigitalVinyl wrote:

Ca deficiency. Dolomite new beds several weeks prior to fertilizing. What does the foliage look like? Are older leaves yellowing and dying?
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No not at all, dark green leaves all over both Jalapa's the anaheim, the bell pepper and the thai dragon plants. THey are all in a star-like cluster with the Jalapa's at the left and right ends. I don't believe this is BER at all. One, it occurs all over the pepper from stem to tip in blotches. The worst ones were so completely rotted that they slushed and poured out of the bottom, these were not black sunken as much as the whole pepper was soggy dripping messes. The skin was intact--it was the flesh underneath that ..uh liquified. I have tomatoes and 5 peppers plants and none of them seem to have BER--at least not as I've found it described. DiGiTAL ViNYL (no email) Zone 6b/7, Westchester Co, NY, <1 mile off L.I.Sound 2nd year gardener http://photos.yahoo.com/ph/royalfrazier /
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DigitalVinyl wrote:

I find that every year is different when it comes to growing things. Consequently, I generally trial things for at least 3 years before crossing them off the list.
On the other hand, there are so many varieties that you can probably afford to write off one of them early. The real question is why did you try the Jalapa? Inattention to detail? Tua culpa. Recommendation from salesperson? Caveat emptor. Recommendation from fellow gardener? Probably worth talking to that person and finding out why it was recommended. Then try again.
I assume you have other varieties growing nearby. If not, soil tests might be in order. If so, you might consider plant pathology tests. Check with your local extension service (if your state hasn't zero funded them). Of course, there is probably a charge for this service, the way things are going. You will have to determine how important it is to you to have a real answer.
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