Are Pine Needles good for compost?

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All speculation and falsehoods aside, it makes a fantastic mulch for Pinus plantings of the same species.
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What speculations are you talking about. I think I've seen a few and wondered if they were the same. I suppose we love pine needle mulch down here because it doesn't compact like shredded wood in the sun and though delicate, breaks down very slowly. If I HAD to buy mulch, I'd buy pine straw bales.
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Pine needles are not always an appropriate mulch. For me to assume that because I like something makes it the best choice seems silly and baseless. This really becomes obvious when assessing compost derived from different sources bilogically. Pinus for the most part are fungal dominated soils. Pine mulch isn't a very good choice for vegies and turf. IMHO (and some smarter than I)
BTW Vic how the heck is your garden these days? and you? :>)

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I have never been better and the garden is trying to sleep. The days are 70s and we had a few almost freezes, nothing too speak of. I believe our garden is finally at a stage where things can be allowed to grow and things are settling in. The coming spring will be the fourth in this garden and it should be the best year to date.
I keep threatening to rent a sod cutter and this winter on a warm day I intend to do that and remove many thousands of sq ft of sod. Sod, the waste of the century, IMO, of course!
Other than that, my life is indeed beyond my wildest dreams. I don't like the idea of having anything in common with Rush Limbaugh, as it seems he now includes, with bravado, terminology of recovery in his lengthy diatribes of hatred. I'm a liberal and want to say FU, but I'm a Buddhist, so I say ILY. That'll have to do. :)
How's the slots?
V

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Feel free to tall me it's none of my beeswax, but I'm curious what sect of buddhism?
Dave
opined:

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Tibetan Buddhism in the Mahayan tradition. I study under, but not directly, Pema Chodron. She is a western born Tibetan Buddhist nun, who lives at Ghempo Abbey in Nova Scotia. Of course, I also study the working of The Dalai Lama, naturally!
Victoria

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On Tue, 09 Dec 2003 14:35:47 -0800, Tom Jaszewski

I do a considerable amount of composting - about 35 yards per year, probably more next year. I use a lot of leaves, grass clippings and manure. The leaves invariably have some pine needles mixed in. One year later , when I have beautiful compost the one defect is the pine needles. They are black from the surrounding compost but otherwise unaffected. I have no idea how long it take to compost them as I have only been doing this for three years and it takes longer than that.
John
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On Sun, 7 Dec 2003 09:03:23 -0500, "Bill Donovan"

Yes! However, if you azalas or other acid-loving plants pine needles make excellent mulch.
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Not unless your plants like acid.

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use them for compost. Personally, I find pine needles are fantastic for winter protection or mulch, which means I didn't compost them. I wish I had access to pine needles where I live now.
John
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Should be okay. I've used them in tree basins for years with no problems but in our desert climate the soil as well as the irrigation water is alkaline. Whole needles are slow to break down due the resins but grinding them should help. I would also be interested in knowing if anybody has any knowledge about the detrimental effect of the resins, if any, on plants.
Olin
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I am really not sure about the effects of resin from pine needles, But I have 28 large pine trees and all the needles go in the garden, around blue berry bushes and in the compost bins, this I have been doing at this locations for 22 years now and all my friends marvel at my garden. Just my $.02
--
Sam
Along the Grand Strand of Myrtle Beach,SC
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I understood that there was a chemical in pine needles that retarded growth. Your experience is oppositie from that. Wonder what is true?
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wrote:

It's possible that the chemical breaks down over time, hence it is okay for compost. As for mulch, the chemical only affects *some* plants, so your strawberries, blueberries, random acidophilic plants, et al., based on empirical observation, should be okay. I posted a couple of links earlier, but they were just the first relevant ones from a yahoo search. The first one might have been just a thesis proposal and so very light on content.
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