3 year old peach tree help

Greetings, 4 years ago we planted (did not fo any soil prep) a peach tree. We live in Tampa FL so the soil is sort of sandy. Ever since it seems that the tree does not grow but does bloom some (has not bore any fruit). I guess my soil is the problem. What can I do without removing the tree that will help it along? Also there are a lot of small branches that have formed. Any idea on pruning/trimming my 7 foot tree that is about 4 feet wide? Thanks Greyhound Tampa, FL
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Here is what I did with mine and I got a bushel of fruit it's second year. I also didn't do soil prep, but I dug a hole three times the size of the root ball, planted it a little higher than it was in the pot to account for settling, and after filling the hole back with the native soil, I top dressed with 4 inches of compost, and 2 inches of shredded native tree trimmings.
After in the ground, I cut the thing to about 3 feet tall. That first year it developed side branches which formed an upside down umbrella. The opening of the umbrella facing the sky. That way, plenty of light could reach the inner branches and help develop fruit.
I got two peaches the first year.
Second winter, about February 14, I went out and pruned all the waterspouts (branches which are growing straight upward from the center of a branch), anything which was growing in toward the center, any branches which were crossing one another and gave the tree some shape, but that shape was still looking like the upside down umbrella.
That year it flowered and after I saw what fruit developed I thinned it to one every 6 inches or so. It meant I got rid of a lot of peach babies, making sure to look for twins, or conjoined peach babies. However, I prefer to have huge, juicy fruits rather than a lot of small, not so juicy fruits.
A bushel that year. Probably more this year.
On Tue, 13 Apr 2004 11:18:43 GMT, "Grey-hound"

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fruit tree fertilizer spikes, water on a timer. I am not sure if you have enough chill hours for peaches. Ingrid

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The lowest chill hours for peaches is about 400 and 'Dixieland' is a variety which performs very well under those few chill hours. I don't know that we "got" 400 hours of 45 degrees or less last winter, but my tree is loaded down.
On Tue, 13 Apr 2004 13:47:06 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@wi.rr.xx.com opined:

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Grey-hound wrote:

Unless your peach is a variety specially hybridized for mild-winnter climates, it is unlikely to thrive. Most peaches prefer some snow in the winter to ensure full dormancy.
I had good performance with Golden Blush and now with Ventura, both of which were specifically created for mild-winter areas. I get no snow but some frost at night for a few weeks in the winter. Even then, peach trees in my climate are productive for only 10-15 years, after which they begin to decline in vigor.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
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