Zucchini blossom end rot

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wrote:

In overstating the obvious... Well, did ya or not?
Back in July someone in CA was also confusing Blossom Drop and BER. hmmm.
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I live in the high desert where summer temperatures routinely head into the 3 digits for days on end. I grow zucchini every year. I have never had a problem with blossom end rot on zucchini, and I don't have a drop in productivity during the heat waves. Corn and tomatoes don't pollinate in the high temps...but zucchini, melons, cucumbers, peppers are all fine.
cj
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Bees seem to be getting a poor rap here, and all of it undeserved. Allow me to put in a word in their defence.
On hot summer days, flowering native trees hum loudly with the sound of beating bees wings. The bees are working even harder in the hot weather!
If the number of bees you see in your garden falls off during heatwave conditions, it's because those bees are needed back at the hive to fan the brood (undeveloped bee lavae) in the comb and regulate the temperature of the hive. Bees don't slack off in heatwave conditions, they actually work harder than ever!
On the topic of zucchinis, as I have written here many times: the beauty of growing zucchinis is that you DON'T NEED BEES because zucchinis don't need pollination. Provided you harvest the fruit within a day or two of its flower having opened, it doesn't matter whether it has been visited by a bee or not.
Only if you want to grow a fruit to maturity do you need bees. But allowing a zucchini to grow large means it loses its flavour, that's why they need to be harvested while young and tender. In addition, not allowing any of the fruit to grow for more than a few days keeps the plant flowering vigorously and producing even more fruit, thus improving the yield. -- John Savage (my news address is not valid for email)
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On 4/12/2009 10:25 PM, David Hare-Scott wrote:

I also found this, in the Net, which tends to give me the clue I was looking for.. I suspect I'm right.
Q: I had a gardener ask me why the blossoms would suddenly fall off his tomato plants. Can you explain that one? Also, why would cucumbers suddenly quit blooming? (Mandan, N.D.)
A: One answer to both questions, high temperatures and a lack of adequate moisture. While both like warm temperatures, the hot weather we've been having and the lack of consistent rainfall will cause both blossom abortion and non blooming. Even our zucchini plants are way down on production this year and that's saying something!
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