which tomato does best in a rainy area

We live in a valley and the weather is relatively wet (it rains every 2-3 days) all year long. Should I protect the tomatoes from the rain? The temperature goes up a lot 35-38C in the summer but air humidity is high.
Which tomato does/would do best in a wet climate?
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We live in a valley and the weather is relatively wet (it rains every 2-3 days) all year long. Should I protect the tomatoes from the rain? The temperature goes up a lot 35-38C in the summer but air humidity is high.
Which tomato does/would do best in a wet climate?
It sounds as if you are describing Houston. I planted my main garden tomatoes on 2/27, hoping like heck that a late season freeze did not set them back. I have been lucky so far!
Dona is a great variety here. I have also had good luck with Juliet cherry/plumb. I get them at the Master Gardener plant sale, so they might not be available in your area.
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It looks like you are in France. I would suggest that you look at the seeds and plants for sale in your area. Also talk to the people at the plant nurseries and neighbors who are growing tomatoes.
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Susan N.

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GH wrote:

I doubt that you will need to protect the foliage from the rain, but it will be very important to have good soil drainage. The plants don't want constantly soggy roots. -aem
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wrote:

Sounds like similar conditions to most of the southeastern US, and I could name some tomatoes that do well under those conditions; but it won't do you much good if you can't get them in France.
Susan's (The Cook) suggestion is a good one. Talk to the people who garden near you, or to the folks at the plant nurseries. If you're interested in something more exotic or heirloom stock, try googling on a phrase like "heirloom tomatoes for Southern France" or "heat and split resistance tomatoes for SF" or what ever is most appropriate.
Penelope
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Thank you for your suggestions. I don't know of any horticultural society or gardner's club in the area and, based on your recommendations, I wanted to order seeds from UK or USA. Does anyone know a seed exchange forum? That could be an easier/faster way.
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My not so expert opinion is that the small cherry types of tomatoes are well suited to such adverse conditions. They grow quickly, bear early in their development, and the tiny fruit reaches ripeness within weeks -- all this happening before fungal diseases can get a stranglehold.
If you can plant them out as advanced seedlings, they will be off to a good start. Some nurseries sell grafted seedlings on the point of flowering. Try a few different ones and see how things pan out. Keep your fingers crossed regarding pollination in wet weather; you are reliant upon local bees for this. -- John Savage (my news address is not valid for email)
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I live in New Zealand, plants here are most likely to fail because of too much water.
I have found that 'Roma' did great in a sunny well drained spot (with poor soil too!).
I have also found that growing tomatoes in sealed terracotta pots is a good solution, and can be quite decorative -underplant with French marigold to keep the bugs away, or basil.
The pots give much better drainage, though you will need to be vigilant with watering and if the pot isn't sealed the drainage will be too good and soak water away from the pot. The terracotta also releases heat from the day once the air has cooled, providing a more even (and warmer if it's sunny) root temperature. Tomatoes seem to like variables consistant.
When the plants are past their best, they can be moved to a less visible spot in the garden. You will need to stake plants.
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