Re: Oak sawdust for compost?



Adding it to a compost pile would probably be OK, I didn't have problems when I did, I'm not sure about just using it directly on the soil, I'd think there'd be some issues about the way it decomposes.
Philip
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I use oak sawdust in my compost pile all the time. It does lower the pH, so you might want to monitor and use lime if you need to sweeten the soil. But it's a great source of carbon for composting.
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snipped-for-privacy@nbr1.com writes:

of horse manure. I will *never* do it again! This was by accident . . . it was hauled soaking wet and the person loading it thought it was well rotted horse manure (and it was hauled and unloaded in the rain also). I should have realized even before it started to dry out since there were few worms in it. (The horse manure I usually get is filled with earthworms, hundreds/thousands in every large wheelbarrowful.)
It brought in new weeds which is distressing since I'd pretty much gotten the weeds under control in the past four years with just the manure. (It had been out in a pasture for years, hence the weeds.) It also "sheds" the water and water does not soak in thoroughly where it initially is dropped (either by soaker, drip or sprinkler). It, of course, did *not* decompose over the summer months as the horse manure does.
Because it came late this year, the garden was all rototilled before it was hauled which aggravated the situation and contributed greatly to the problems.
Would I let it happen again? Not no, but 7734 no! I'd rather have relied on whatever was left from past years than let this have happened.
My obviously unbiased <sarcasm here> answer would be, don't do it! What went on my garden would have been Douglas Fir which is likely benign which oak may or may not be. It might work very well in other situations and unlikely would have worked better had it been tilled in as you plan to do.
As always, your experience could well be entirely different, for many reasons. Please keep us posted as to the results; I hope your story is a happy one.
Glenna
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NEVER add staight uncomposted sawdust of any kind into your garden. The process of decomosition takes valuable nitrogen out of your soil. I have rabbits that use pine shavings as litter and keep a separate compost pile for their leavings. The pile will compost all winter( started in spring) and by next spring will be added to the garden.Some sawdusts may take two years for decomosition to take place. Oak, being a hard wood and full of tanic acid, may take longer.
--
Jayel
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