Re: Apricot seedling

I just wanted to ask if anyone has any infromation about seeding and starting fruit trees from the pits? Specifically peach, apricot and plum? Thank you for any info or even a good reference to find out more. -- Christina ------------------------------------------------------------------------ posted via www.GardenBanter.co.uk
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Almost everyone will advise you not to start a good tree from a pit or seed. The fruit will not be the same as the one it came from. However, I was given several peach trees that grew when they were thrown into a compost pile and left over the winter. In the spring, they started coming up, were potted, given to me and I planted them.
After 3 or 4 years they started having fruit. One tree would ripen and about a week or 10 days the second would ripen. The fruit tasted good, but I didn't buy the basket of peaches initially and cant tell you what kind they were.
Buying a tree will give you fruit faster, and you will know what you are getting. Other wise, go ahead and get the seeds to sprout and plant the new trees.
Dwayne

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Not trying to be a smart ass but, since it would seem that such trees start from a pit somplace, so whats the problem? Are they a weaker tree, and if so then where does a stronger one come from? I would think for example that a pit from Apricot variety 'A' would in-fact produce a tree of Apricot variety 'A' as opposed to variety 'B' or 'C' etc. Just trying to understand as I have planted a few Apricot seeds and am hoping they sprout, and if not maybe you can assist in explaining why they will/did not. Thanx...
Dwayne wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hi Christina, I'm following this thread with interest. Seems like most people don't understand about pollination. When you plant a seed or stone, the resulting tree is a mix between the original tree and whatever tree supplied the pollen to do the job. With fruit trees, like Apple, this can produce strange results, like a crab apple pollinating a Red Delicious. However, with Peaches there is a better chance of good outcome because Peaches are self fertile. This means that unless there are a bunch of other Peach trees of different varieties nearby, the original Peach tree will probably pollinate itself, thus preserving the characteristics of the original tree. What is lost in this process is the ability to regulate the size of the tree. If you start with a semi dwarf Peach, the planted stones from that tree will probably develop into a full size Peach tree. The only way to control its size is to graft a piece of that tree (scion) onto a semi dwarf Peach rootstock. Well, that's the end of my little tutorial on planting Peach stones. Hope it clears the air.
Sherwin Dubren Midwest Fruit Explorers (MidFEx)
Christina wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sherwin Dubren wrote:

The peach trees' genes will recombine, and the seedling characteristics are pretty much unpredictable.
Best regards, Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.