Potato Harvest question


BlankWe dug some of our red potatoes as the vines were dead . How do we go about storing them? My husband heard something about leaving them in the sun for a day or so,but I thought the sun was bad for them,would turn them green.
Bonnie
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storing them? My husband heard something about leaving them in the sun for a day or so,but I thought the sun was bad for them,would turn them green.
Store in a not too cool dry place for about a month, then into a cold cellar, as close to 100% humidity and barely above freezing as possible.
Gary Woods AKA K2AHC- PGP key on request, or at home.earthlink.net/~garygarlic Zone 5/6 in upstate New York, 1420' elevation. NY WO G
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Won't they sprout with that much humidity? And I thought the real cold like refrig temp made the starch change to sugar??
wrote:

about storing them? My husband heard something about leaving them in the sun for a day or so,but I thought the sun was bad for them,would turn them green.

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You are confusing potatoes with sweet potatoes. Curing sweet potatoes consist of laying then out where they will be in the heat (80 degrees - not the sun - winter squash go into he sun) and high humidity (80 + percent) for 10 to days (longer if you cant match either of those conditions - add another 5 or so days). That turns the starch to sugar.
Then store them as close to 55 degrees as possible (mine stay at 65 to 70 degrees F). If they get colder like in a frig, the sugar will turn back into starch and will not go back to sugar again.
I just dug my first box of sweet potatoes yesterday, and will get the rest before the first frost. Here is a question for the group. If we get a surprise frost over night, how long after the sun comes up do I have to rip all the greens of the top before the potatoes are ruined?
Dwayne
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Dwayne wrote:

If a hot sun after frost ruins sweet potatoes, does it also ruin Irish potatoes? I had not heard of that before.
Lightnin Dave
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Dave I don't think the sun has anything to do with it. I think it just takes the chemical change in the sweet potato leaves to get down in the potatoes and make them bitter. I honestly don't know.
When it happened to me I was in zone 7, I was out at sun up ripping off the greens to save the potatoes. Now I am in zone 5 and dig them in spurts. I have been out twice this year digging them and putting them in to cure, so that if we get a surprise frost, I wont have to get up early and kill myself to save the crop.
I have no idea about Irish potatoes and what effect frost will have on them. I have never been around someone who has raised them. When ever I raised them, I had them dug by the end of August.
Dwayne

rip
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Bonnie said:

I store mine right in the ground under a thick layer of chopped straw. The risks are that voles will nibble on some of them. The benefits are that they are stored in a cool, damp area so they don't sprout and shrivel up, which is what potatoes stored in my house always do.
--
Pat in Plymouth MI ('someplace.net' is comcast)

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