Nematodes

Has anyone had any luck with beneficial nematodes in tryin to control fleas? TIA
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snipped-for-privacy@comp.com writes:

I can't say they controlled fleas, but I have used them each season and my cats seemed not to be bothered. However, trapped squirrels are loaded with them. The difference might be the cats are primarily on the ground and stay at home whereas the squirrels inhabit the entire neighborhood.
I am one of those unfortunates that a flea will find my ankles, and I've not had a problem at home though I occasionally do at parks and at other houses.
Whether the nematodes help is anyone's guess, but they must do a lot positive as they and the ladybugs are spring additions to my yard and garden. My garden has been very fortunate with the only problems discussed here that have manifested in my garden is blossom end rot on some tomatoes last year. That seems to have been a watering issue since it has not repeated.
There are many herbs that can be planted to also discourage fleas, Pennyroyal being one which also makes a great (and pleasant smelling) ground cover. There are others also; perhaps others will name some of those.
Glenna
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wrote:

Somewhat... but they still work best in combination with topical treatments on the dogs.
At least that was my experience this year. :-)
K.
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Nematodes will definitely help in controlling fleas. The use of diatomaceous earth will also help, but it only helps when it is dry. If it gets wet it is useless. The diatomaceous earth is very sharp and abrasive to a flea and it essentially cuts and abrades the fleas and they basically dehydrate and die. It is VERY important to use natural diatomaceous earth and not "D E" that has been treated for use in swimming pool filters. You can find information on both of these topics on the Dirt Doctor's site www.dirtdoctor.com I am not affiliated with his site. Tons of good organic info there. Thomas

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Nematodes may help... but nematodes die very quickly if conditions aren't perfect. Tried them for termites... no luck.
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conditions need not be "perfect" for nematodes. It does need to be moist. It very well may be that the nematodes you bought were dead before you applied them.
Thomas

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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com writes:

And . . . the ones I purchase have directions that say they must *not* be applied in direct sunlight. An overcast or even misty day would be ideal.
Glenna
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com-d;820526 Wrote: > Hi there big problem with most potatoes this year SLUGS little buggers > eating into the potatoe and just sitting there,been recomended to use > NEMATODES anyone tried this or any other idea's?

Hi Dave you should try growing Kestrel seed potatoes as they are slug resistant.
Nematodes could cause you more problems with your potatoes.
Regards Iain
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I think he's referring to beneficial nematodes. They are good. :-)
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@gardenbanter.co.uk says...

You're probably talking about potato cyst nematode or some such.
Com-d is asking about predatory nematodes.
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Had good success with them up to this year. But the wet summer overcame the advantages and the slug population increased dramatically despite the nematodes. What would have happened if I had not used them is anyone's guess. Maybe I should have applied another lot later in the season.
Something I've noticed though, is that not all damage to potatoes is caused by slugs. This year I found manure worms were a culprit and quite a few worms had buried themselves into the potatoes. The problem occurred mostly around the tubers that were affected with blight. I seems manure worms love blight.
PDM.
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For slugs, try pans of beer. They are especially partial to dark ale. :-)
I kid you not.
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www.recyclenow.org/less-toxic/SnailsSlugs.PDF
Iron phosphate = Sluggo
It made gardening much less frustrating for me this year:O)
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