Lower crop yields due to Ozone

Could this be affecting our own garden food production?
On a larger scale, in view of the current hoo-hah in the pop media about world-wide food shortages and skyrocketing local U.S. price increases, why not forward this to your Senate or House whore. (No offense to honest sex workers).
There is less and less food available to the organizations that feed the poor in countries outside these happy shores, in part because their budgets are fixed, and food prices have shot up. Result: world-wide hunger. A child dies of starvation every few seconds. Nice.
The handful of our Congressional reps. who take seriously the oath they swore can do little in the face of the majority who are in it for power, privilege, and a fat, pension-cum medical care. Plus, of course, a cushy job in the industry they were supposed to be regulating. (Don't let the revolving door hit you on the way out, dear people's representative.)
Still...could do no harm to forward this where it might do some good. Even the most politically-blinded Republicans are beginning to understand that global warming/climate change is a reality. Or maybe they're only running for cover, come election day.
Wonder if the Environmental Pollution Agency, perhaps the most heavily politicized of all the Bush era puppet shows, is looking at this research.      http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/ 080603183309.htm     
Lower Crop Yields Due To Ozone A Factor In World Food Crisis
ScienceDaily (Jun. 9, 2008) Heat waves, droughts and fuel prices are just a few reasons for the current global food crisis that is making headlines around the world. Research by William Manning of the University of Massachusetts Amherst indicates that rising background levels of ozone in the atmosphere are a likely contributor to the problem, lowering the yield of important food crops, such as wheat and soybeans.
Plants are much more sensitive to ozone than people, and a slight increase in exposure can have a large impact on their productivity, says Manning, a professor of plant, soil and insect sciences. The new ozone standard set by the U.S. EPA in March 2008 is based on protecting human health, and *****may not be strict enough to protect plants. ****Manning served on the Clean Air Science Advisory Committee for the EPA in 1997 when the previous air quality standard for ozone was developed.
According to Manning, emission controls on cars have been successful in reducing short periods of high ozone levels called peaks, but average concentrations of ozone in the atmosphere throughout the year, called the background level, is increasing as *****polluted air masses from Asia travel to the U. S. and then on to Europe.***** Background levels are now between 20 and 45 parts per billion in Europe and the United States, and are expected to increase to between 42 and 84 parts per billion by 2100.
Manning was recently part of a team of researchers studying how ozone levels in the Yangtze Delta affect the growth of oilseed rape, a member of the cabbage family that produces one-third of the vegetable oil used in China. By growing the plants in chambers that controlled the ozone environment, the team showed that exposure to elevated ozone reduced the size and weight, or biomass, of the plants by 10 to 20 percent. Production of seeds and oil was also reduced. Results of the study are scheduled for publication in Environmental Pollution.
*****What was surprising about this research was that plants exposed to ozone levels that peaked in the late afternoon suffered more damage than plants exposed to a steady ozone concentration throughout the day, even though average ozone concentrations were the same for both groups, says Manning. This shows that current ozone standards that rely on average concentrations would underestimate crop losses.*****
Additional research in the Yangtze Valley, which accounts for nearly half of Chinas crop production, showed that wheat was more sensitive to ozone than rice. Plants vary widely in their sensitivity to ozone, and varieties of the same species can react differently, says Manning. Some of the most sensitive plant species are from the legume and cabbage families, which include radishes, broccoli and soybeans.
******Plants can limit ozone damage for short periods of time by reducing the size of pores on their leaves called stomata. This reduces the uptake of ozone, but also carbon dioxide, which is used as the plants make food through the process of photosynthesis. Chronic exposure results in reduced photosynthesis, plant growth and yields. In the long term, leaf injury occurs when the amount of ozone taken in exceeds the leafs capacity to provide antioxidants to counter its effects.*****
This summer, Manning will be investigating the effects of ozone on a variety of plants in the Pioneer Valley of Massachusetts, where ozone levels are often above the EPA standard as pollution from New York City and Washington, D.C. moves northward during the day. Plants will be grown in open fields, and some will be treated with a compound that blocks the effects of ozone. If the treated plants are healthier than the untreated group, then ozone will be the cause.
Persephone
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says...
Thanks for the article and link.
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Dear Persephone:
On Jun 10, 8:17pm, Persephone wrote: ...

The people we send to office will not tell us that we must immediately stop using fossil fuels, of which consumption / spillage provides the NOx and hydrocarbons necessary to produce the lion's share of tropospheric ozone.
Note that the areas you glancingly refer to as starving due to lack of food, do not have ozone problems as drivers of starvation. In this case, "starvation" is like the new political term "drought". There are more people than an area can support. It is not a problem with the area... it is what it is. It is the populace.
Politicians are where they are because they have a particular disease, and they cause problems if they are not sent away periodically. That leaves us to do the work, as always.
David A. Smith
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It is a simple confrontation between property rights and human rights. Do the owners of property have the right to make money on their property if that action leads to the infringement of human rights? In this case it is the deaths of individuals and the habitat that they need to survive.
The only concerns that the hogs-in-a-trough Republicans have is doing nothing and getting re-elected. Cap and trade is a bogus approach to global warming. Back when we were still trying to figure out acid rain, we did cap and trade, while Germany imposed fines. Germany reached their target goal, the US didn't.
We need to cut fossil fuel energy by half. Then we need to redistribute half of the remaining consumption to those countries that have the greatest need to create wind, sea, and solar power.
First application of manure/compost tea to garden to day;-)
individual?
--

Billy
Bush and Pelosi Behind Bars
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Hello Billy:

...
As a child, I never understood "property rights". I would play with what was in front of me, but I never felt it was "mine". No part of me was there...

Money is a unit of trust. An owner gave trust to someone else, in order to gain the trust of the community. Trust grows, but trust cannot be demanded.

There are multiples of people now, in the same area that can only support the smaller number, and then at a subsistence level. "Ownership" had nothing to do with overbreeding, ignorance and lack of foresight did.

I love bashing Repubilicans too. But they are neither the problem, nor the answer. Excuses that point away from our own nature protect the ego, not those that are going to die.
...

Agreed. Now who will die here?

Agreed. And then they too can arrange their deaths.

I've got one citrus tree, a couple of wild "tobacco trees", and I keep trying to grow more dogs from the little "seeds" they leave... but no fruit there yet.

Always.
We either develop a frontier, or we die back to sustainable levels. Anything else sets us up to develop contagion that Science cannot keep up with and we go extinct (or lose "sapiens", global autism perhaps).
David A. Smith
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Then you get sleepy and find someone in your bed and you discover property rights.

But a jeweler will always give you something of value for gold. No trust needed.

There is lots of uninhabited land not in use but normally when someone tries to redistribute the land, they get called a communist, and shot. I find your condescending assumptions about family units, education, and social planning distasteful. These problems could be addressed if it weren't for the manipulation of govenments to concentrate wealth into the hands of the already rich. What is the purpose of society, to see who can get the most things before they die, or to give humanity it's best chance at survival?

This statement was balanced in the original post but for the sake of clarity let me state that the Republican Party is the conservative sock-puppet and the Democratic Party is the moderate sock-puppet of "hogs-in-a-trough" ownership.

Your a real self loathing Calvinist, aren't you?

That's not my presumption. A giant step in the right direction would be conservation and a mandate for cars to get 40 mpg and speed up the transitioning to zero emission cars. Screw market forces, we need leadership.

Same argument as above. Developing nations have fewer resources with which to make the transition to non-fossil fuel energy. You write like you're coming down.

Demographically, empirically it has been shown that when rising standards of living leads to lower birth rates. Europeans use considerably less energy than we do, and have an admirable life style that American can only dream of.
It doesn't have to be the end of the world, unless we insist.

--

Billy
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Hello Billy:

...
Sorry. Gets in the way of the message. No point in carrying this further.
In answer to your question:

I believe that society *is* the strong preying on the weak. It usually does so in a way that the weak manage to flourish anyway. With leadership.
We both agree that something can be done, but we will ever disagree on means. And we wholeheartedly agree that leadership is required. But so is vision, commitment, talent, and a big dose of "good luck".
Growing any asparagus?
David A. Smith
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Nothing can be done anything is possible.
Bill feeling a bit old china.
--
Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA
Book "Our Media Not Theirs" Many Stars
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Dear Persephone:
On Jun 11, 3:39pm, Persephone wrote:

...
And that way was starvation, disease, and shorter lifespan.

...
...
It is the nature of Mankind to seek eternal lifespan (at least in youth), and "The Garden of Eden" where struggle is not necessary. It is built into the organism. It is not the fault of any particular Administration. However idiotic and shortsighted this one appears now (and may always so appear).
...

Elections are to send the dangerous to a special velvet lined prison. We get what we imagine, or we get the default, which is Mankind-as- global-disease.
Gaia is waiting for Man (pardon the sexism... inherent in "Gaia", so...) to take her hand and walk into the future together. Neither Obama, McCain, nor any politician control what we can see, what we teach our own children.
Had to bring it back to gardening, somehow... ;>)
David A. Smith
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