Horticultural Myths, Dr. L. Chalker-Scott

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Have you moved? Did you used to post as Gunner A....? If you are, then last time I read you regularly (in an ng where Offbr.... posts regularly, I was then posting as Fran H....) I thought you used to live in California in a pretty dry place???

I know that ginger is often treated with an antisprouting agent and as galangal is part of the same family then perhaps yours could have been treated too.
Lemon

Some very interesting stuff on that cite. Lots of plants I've never even heard of and probably couldnt' grow or even get my hands on. thanks - lots of meat to read up on.
plus some cooking blogs. Damn good

I find this site useful as you can search using ingredients which you have on hand and as I'm the sort of cook who cooks from the basic ingredients, it works well for me. http://www.taste.com.au /

Lord, that's a question and a half!
If you are who I think you are, I have some similar interests to you. I have a particular interest in social history so that leads me to want to know about how people survived and often thrived in an age when there was far less technology than we have access to today and which in these days of peak oil etc may yet come round again.
I have an interest in all the domestic arts (except dusting and vacuuming which TMWOT thinking are just drudgery) so that means sewing (hand and machine) spinning (both wheel and spindle), weaving, knitting, cooking and preserving, gardening for food for humans and animals, gardening for medicine's of a folk origin, gardening for physic health (flowers), domestic animal keeping (which in reality at this stage just means chooks (and the farm's beef cattle) but I am seriously tempted to add both ducks and rabbits [for both fibre and food]. I even have a spot picked out for the duck pen but as I started building a fruit cage and needed help from Himself, I haven't yet broached the subject of the duck pen.
I tend to grow organically as I find in my situation (rural Australia - hot in summer, frosty in winter, increasingly dry due to changes in weather patterns) it works for me as it suits me 'social history' interest and it also uses raw materials that are readily available from our farm, neighbour's farms or from our fires, compost heaps, chooks, cows etc.
I am also a seed saver but a bit sloppy about it and grow only open pollinated heritage varieties of the more basic crops such as tomatoes. I'm not so fussy for things like rockmelons (cantaloups) and water melons, but they are neither a basic crop nor even one that can reach maturity easily in my climate anyway.
I also grow fruit and am interested in grafting and found this to be easy to do and not at all a mystery.
Anyway, here are some sites which may or may not interest you. Some of them are Australian sites but I find that I learn a lot from sites that are 'foreign' because they make me see things in a different light and to think about other options. http://www.pfaf.org/index.php http://www.thelostseed.com.au/index.htm http://www.4seasonsseeds.com.au/epages/4seasons.sf/en_AU/?ObjectPath=/Shops/4seasons_seeds http://www.edenseeds.com.au/content/seeds.asp?section=1&letter=A http://www.seedsavers.net / http://www.seedsavers.org / http://www.cityfarmer.org/grandpasVG.html http://www.kitchengardeners.org / http://onestraw.wordpress.com/sub-acre-ag/sub-acre-ranching-chickenrabbit-tractors / http://www.greenharvest.com.au/
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wrote in message
Thank you Farmi.
I have an amateur anthropologist view also. we had a old series her in the US called the Foxfire books that I enjoyed. old stories of the hill folks, bee keeping, chicken raising, gun making, bear hunting, even "shine" stories. lots of old "getting by" stories from back in the day.
No, that is not me. we left Europe in 87 and moved here, retired in 92, did a few contractor jobs and now just keeping busy with "things". Trying my hand at Breads and Sourdough, would like to have some ducks and chicken but we live in a development on the edge of some green belts, I do have a neighbor with 8 acres behind me that raises chicken and pheasant. Been thinking of Beekeeping. Definately have to learn canning. Tomatoes are doing very well this year and expect to have a new hydro system this week and another next month to test run for greens and lettuces in the late summer early fall.
I am looking at all your links this week
Again, thanks. hope to read lots from ya.
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given> wrote in message> I have an amateur anthropologist view also. we had a old series her in the

I know the series well. I got the first of the Foxfire books sometime in the early?? '70s. I don't have the full set as some have obviously been 'lent' over the years and never came home again. I was going to throw the remaining ones out to make more bookshelf space a few years ago and couldn't bring myself to let them go.

Amazing how once one retires there are so few hours in the day. I',m amazed now that I ever found time to go to work.
Trying my

I used to make bread all the time. For some reason, I've not been doing so recently - must get back to it now our kitchen range is on for the duration of the winter. There is less of a need now as we now have a superb bread shop semi-locally. He does Beer Baguettes made form his own home brewed beer and they last about 5 minutes from the time they get to our kitchen to the time they disappear into our gobs.
would like to have some ducks and chicken but

Bottled (you'd say canned) tomatoes are a good place to start if you get some surplus. It's not rocket science and there is enormous satisfaction in seeing shelves of home bottled goods lined up waiting for the winter.
There is a ng called rec.food.preserving which might be worth looking at.
I notice that American style jars are now available here and thought I might buy a few of the smaller ones to try a different technique.
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wrote:

Let it just sit in the pot and be patient. It can take much longer to produce shoots than ginger, in my experience. In fact I just went through the same things with two large chunks of galangal that I picked up at a Thai grocery. The market had them wrapped in plastic and refrigerated.
I just kept the pot in indirect light with regular watering. It took at least 2 months for shoots to appear. In fact, I was about to dig it up and toss it when I saw the eyes developing and re-buried it.
Turmeric can take a long, long time, too, even longer than galangal.
Boron
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Good to know, I checked em, no rot but no signs of roots or sprouts as yet, been a while, but the ginger took just last week-10 days, planted same time .
Would love to find some turmeric, just going through all the Indian and Asian spices to see what I may be able to maintain here. Dr. Morgan has a list of Hydro spices/herbs that I am reading up on now. May be able to heat them that way to get a longer season but still fighting the idea of lighting the green house, the nursery is bad enough.
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