Greenhouse heating question

In another newsgroup, there's a discussion about heating a greenhouse. Electric heaters were mentioned. Also kerosene, but comments were made about fumes and stickiness. Someone recommended a plain propane barbecue. It was stated that the CO2 would be good for the plants. I was wondering about the CO produced, and what the levels would be.
What is the best/worst ways to do supplemental heat in a greenhouse?
Steve
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Strange. I always used sunlight to warm a greenhouse.
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On Tue, 29 Dec 2009 07:04:43 -0600, AZ Nomad

It depends on how cold the nights are. I use an electric heater at night to keep the temperature warm enough to prevent stunting the plants. As soon as the sun comes up I have to watch the thermometer to make sure that it doesn't get too hot.
The only time I run the heater is when I have seedlings in the greenhouse. I do not try to grow stuff during the winter since the quality of produce is not worth the cost.
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perhaps you should consider patenting that technique and attach a a switch so you can turn it on at night.
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Use a layer of rocks on the floor to hold heat from the daytime sun. This isn't rocket science.
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That being the case then water would be the heat sink of choice because nothing holds heat better than water. Ideally, the container would be a thermal conductor, but fish tanks, or other transparent materials would make it easier for the water to trap the heat.
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Picky are we? OK, one thing is better at holding heat, ammonia.
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poor have no food, they call you a communist.
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I assume we're talking about specific heat? Is the ammonia allowed a phase change?
Gary Woods AKA K2AHC- PGP key on request, or at home.earthlink.net/~garygarlic Zone 5/6 in upstate New York, 1420' elevation. NY WO G
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Sheesh, I'm gonna have to start carrying my roll of taped up dimes again, when I wander into the garden. I'd say that the group had spring fever, but I know it isn't spring.
Sure, let the ammonia have a dang phase change. Make it plasma if you like. Don't be timid now. Where are you going with this? Is there a planet circling a star in Andromeda, where if one knows where to look, there is this substance under a rock, that makes water #3? (In specific heat that is, not like ice #9.)
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In article

A search for R-values via
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/R-value_(insulation)
Seems related.
Bill who noticed that a wet hand is very much colder than a dry one.
--
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wrote:

and confuses conduction with evaporation.
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What leads you to that flange-headed opinion? Uh, if I may ask?
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look up evaporation. Look up conduction. Try to learn the difference. Another hint: R only refers to one.
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Presumptuous and derisive, therefore, you must be a poser. Well, good luck with that, flange-head.
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OK, bad humor. Passive solar applications and man's useage has long been an interest of mine. There are too many varibles for it to be a reliable source of heat, perhaps a good supplement, but the other side of the coin is that heat sinks work in the summer much better, usually to the deterimate of the plants.
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The best is the least inexpensive method, whatever that is for your setup and area. I have seen setups area in more temperate areas use a closed loop system w/ a hose coiled under compost. Others; water barrels painted black for heat sinks, These tricks don't work here in the cool PNW maritime climate. The C02 could boost plant health, but it would be a waste of time it your plant are dormant as most are in winter. If you are a commerical grower then heating is a cost of business and you usually get a bit of heat from all those 1000w bulbs.
I am building warming benches (bottom heat ) w/ heat cables( ~1$ a foot+ thermostat), but electricity is relatively inexpensive here compared to fuel. I can put plants on the warm sand and if necessary, enclose them with bubble wrap, all inside the house. Old christmas lights wrapped around plants can help, the old 100W bulb is good for a few feet in an open GH, I would use a blower if you use a propane BBQ grill, definate test by temps at various feet away from heat source.
here are the commericals setup: http://brae.calpoly.edu/CEAE/greenhouse.html
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Hmmm ...
Do plants need Oxygen as well as CO2?
The root growth for new plants I believe needs Oxygen more than CO2. If one puts the propane barbecue heater inside the greenhouse this may be bad for the plants because the heat would use up the Oxygen. If I went with a propane heater it would be a camper style heater in which the heater is outside and blows the heat inside the greenhouse OR has an exhaust vent to the outside. Electric mats under the plants are probably the best way to go. Electric is also nice for the over head watering systems.
Electric can be a problem if the greenhouse is not near a power source. So therefore ... propane.
Enjoy Life ... Dan
--
Garden in Zone 5 South East Michigan.

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I don't believe any of these three points are necessarily true.

Good to vent the Carbon Monoxide buildup if people work in the area and I agree bottom heat is better.

and for emergency situations a charcoal or wood grill would help.

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