Coated Seeds Question

What is the deal with these things? I have a terrible time getting them to germinate. Is it me? I have tried soaking them, I have tried scoring them. I have tried just planting them. I can't tell you the number ratio of what comes up but enough don't that I am asking the question. MJ
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Seed for what?
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On Wednesday, November 6, 2013 4:13:31 PM UTC-5, Billy wrote:

Pepper and tomato most frequently
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I wish I had an answer for you. The sales pitch for these coated seeds is that either the coating protects, and promotes the plants, which you say it didn't, or it is supposed to make the seed more amenable to automatic planting systems.
I get at least 2/3 germination from new seeds, often more. Empirically, it seems that you do worse. I would ask the company what's going on, if I had any interest in continuing this effort.
Sorry, I can't be more helpful.
"Gardening is the purest of human pleasures." - Francis Bacon
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On Sunday, November 10, 2013 12:45:35 AM UTC-5, Billy wrote:

These are replacement seeds for the first ones that didn't germinate :) Out of a whole package of pepper seeds I have 2 that sprouted. I am still waiting for the second round of tomatoes. Go figure MJ
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote: ...

do you use heat pads under the seed trays?
songbird
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On Sunday, November 10, 2013 12:20:06 PM UTC-5, songbird wrote:

No but it is warm in the house. I germinate in the house and then move things to the greenhouse. They are also under an Aero Garden light. MJ
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote: ...

on a table? on the floor? near a window? near a door? near a heat vent?
it may not be warm enough, if you are going to keep trying to germinate peppers and tomatoes a pad is well worth the expense. if you were closer i'd give you mine to try out to see what happens...
songbird
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On Sunday, November 10, 2013 2:41:42 PM UTC-5, songbird wrote:

On a table near a large window. The house is always over 70 and I have no problem germinating other seeds. The Aero Garden is always full of something, Basil right now. I did actually notice a tomato that had come up yesterday so I guess there is hope MJ
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I'd recommend a heat pad and a grow light connected to a timer. If you have troble with damping off, sterilize the soil first (at least 181 F for 20 min.) I get good results with it.
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I'm guessing that these seeds are meant for direct planting. The coatings are meant to assure germination and/or spacing. IIRC, much of this pelletizing is done for grain crops, and alfalfa (lucern) which are then mechanically sown. With that in mind, pelletizing peppers, and tomato seeds would seem to imply a more ambitious planting than most gardeners would consider.
Direct planting in the U.S. at this time of year may still be an option in Florida, but direct planting anywhere else would be severely limited by soil temperature. Tomatoes, and peppers need a soil temp of about 70 F to germinate, and at least 60 F to grow. Perhaps, "mjciccarel" is antipodal, and already in mid-spring.
Still, seed coating can also serve as a carrier of fungicides, bactericides, and insecticides that protect the seed and emerging seedling. If it truly worked, it would allow me , perhaps, to skip the sterilizing of my germination soil (181 F/ 20 min.), which I do to avoid "damping off".
"Ciccarel", does that come with an Italian pronunciation?
Ciao
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On Sunday, November 10, 2013 2:03:48 PM UTC-5, Billy wrote:

:) Out







Yep Italian by marriage. I am in South Eastern North Carolina. My green hou se is small enough that I can keep those temperatures through out the winte r. Well, as long as it doesn't get crazy cold. USUALLY I have established p lants by now and they are much easier to maintain. I have just had a hard t ime getting anything started this fall. I do have 2 large pepper plants tha t are still producing and one tomato that is on its' way out. I took a cutt ing from that at stuck it into a hydroponic pot hoping for the best but not counting on it. That plant still has 8 green tomatoes. I have 6 more hydro ponic pots that I hate to have empty. I have some broccoli in one and some onion sets in another. I have lettuce and spinich in pots with dirt and the y are starting to take off. It has been really warm here until the last wee k or so. MJ
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Billy wrote: ...

coated seeds in quantity are for greenhouse growers who have machines to plant entire trays at a shot (using air pressure). rather nifty idea actually. some of them are even pre-treated to start germination so that the grower has fewer days of waiting for sprouts. these must be kept carefully refrigerated.
in field applications (alfalfas, clovers, etc) the coating is also likely innoculated with beneficial nitrogen fixing bacterial species.
for damping off problems i've always done ok using grit on the surface instead of cooking the soil.
songbird
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And where do you get the grit, bird?

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Billy wrote:

...

pet store (birds need grit) or feed store (chickens, etc. need grit).
however, in thinking a bit, it seems rather silly to just not buy a sterile seed starting mix. you don't need that much to get going and it isn't that terribly expensive.
or... you could mix worm castings and compost in the mix and see if that helps. it's not that hard to trial.
or... or... i've heard mention of sharp sand or mason sand being used in a similar manner as grit, but i have not tried it myself so cannot say much from direct experience.
songbird
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Not raising poultry, the question of bird grit never occurred to me.
Thanks.
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Billy wrote:

...

you're welcome. i used to live with someone who had a bunch of birds. messy, noisy, expensive hobby, plants and worms are certainly more my speed. :) birds belong outside or in a very large and fairly wild aviary, not in a tiny cage. grr... anyways. time to fly.
cheers,
songbird
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Humph, don't get all in a flap about it ;O)
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