Avocados from seeds? Any tips?

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Hi all, I am going to try to plant an avocado from a seed. I have searched websites and found 2 main ways of doing it, First let the seed sit in water pointed end up till it sprouts.(I've tried this method once before and all that happened was the seed split in half after about 2 weeks or so.) The second method I have found on the web was just planting it in soil, I found a site that suggested to cut the pointed tip of the seed off about 1/4 inch or so and plant the seed with just the cut part exposed above the soil. Has anybody had any success with either method and any tips? I read today that if you try the water method it helps to add charcoal to the water to "Sweeten" it. Would this charcoal idea also work with soil? And would a regular charcoal briquette work? I live in southern Ca about 30-50 miles from where Avocados normally grow, It may be to cold here but just not sure, Still like to try. Also not sure about what type of Avocado seed I have to plant, A friend brought some over a few weeks ago and there were mixed varieties. I am soaking the seed completley submerged in tap water for the moment, Just to keep from drying out till I figure out which method to use. But will decide either way by tomorrow (Tuesday). I had 4 years of horticultre back in highschool but that was years ago and we never really started things from seed. Thanks for any advice Steve
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On 09 Feb 2004 22:12:12 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Shystev99) wrote:

    My mother would stick toothpicks in them so that they would rest on top of a glass of water with just the bottom of the seed wet.
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Thanks, I tried that once before about 4 - 5 years ago and the seed split in half, I did have it submerged about 3/4 of the way up the seed though, with the pointed end up. Maybe I just had to much water in the glass and instead of sprouting the seed just drowned and deteriorated? Steve
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Steve, Not every seed will sprout. I usually only get about half of them to do anyhing. Try the three toothpicks again on about 4 of them in bottles. Change water every week or so if it is starting to get dirty or smelly.
My uncle used to live in LA and we found people with trees that did OK near where he lived. I dont know where you are from there, but use that as a guide.
Dwayne

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i soak them in water for a day or two, then i plant them directly in the soil...like dwayne stated, not every one will sprout, i'd say roughly about 50%, more or less.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Shystev99) wrote in message

We used soft drink bottles. Remove the cap, cut the top off and invert it into the lower portion of the bottle. The top then becomes more or less a funnel to hold the seed in position. Fill the bottle with water, enough to cover the bottom 1/2 to 1/3 of the seed. Refill as needed. Yes the seed will split, but still be supported by the neck of the bottle. When it is grown enough to plant, the bottle can be cut off using a strong pair of scissors. The bottles with wider caps, may allow the root to be lifted through the opening without damaging the root.
We used that method to avoid fighting with the tooth picks working loose, and to prevent "mechanical damage" that could bruise the seed and cause rot.
Cautions:
If the fruit was picked too green the seed may not sprout. Try and have the avacados ripe as possible before attempting. The riper fruit means better guacamole anyway.
Try to let the water set out long enough to neutralize the chlorine and chemical additives if you are using water from a municipal supply, and not make any extreme temperature changes when refilling.
Whether they bear fruit depends on the hybridization used to create the original fruit, pollinators, and environment. All takes time. We never tried to plant the trees in the ground, the climate was too severe. However they made lovely tropical houseplants, until they got too big to move around. Takes several years for that.
Good luck
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Thats a good idea, Need to go out and buy some softdrink bottles it may work with Thanks, Steve
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(Shystev99) wrote:

The splitting is normal, the seed does that when it germinates. We used to grow them as house plants in Montana. They are not cold-hardy, but will grow fine indoors in near-darkness, and can be pruned to any shape or size. None of our indoor avocados bore fruit, but they looked nice.
We got tired of doing the toothpick thing and just started sticking them into pots with any soil that was handy, point-up, and every single one grew (sometimes they take a while to sprout). This was much better than the success rate with the water and toothpick thing.
~REZ~
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step 1: learn how to use a web search tool like google. go to http://www.google.com enter search string like "grow advocados"
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While I agree somewhat, and have finally learnt to google most of the time, what good are these discussion lists if we can't discuss questions like this?
Sometimes websearching can be frustrating, and it's nice to talk directly to other folks that have had first hand experience!
The pineapple thread is a perfect example. It's motivated me to give planting those seeds a shot! We do find them from time to time when skinning store bought pineapples. :-)
I've never had much luck personally growing an avocado from seed. I had one once that got to be about 3 ft. high, then died.
I finally sprang for some grafted ones on ebay. They were reasonable.
K.
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I agree, Isn't the purpose of newsgroups like this is to have a forum people with certain interests can go to share information, talk to other people, share successes, share failures, share ideas for how to avoid problems, and most importantly have a place where we can learn and teach? I apologize to the entire board for snapping at the poster who told me to learn how to use google. I don't honestly know if the person meant it as a personal shot or attack but the way it was worded

To me looked more as a remark that was meant to imply I was either lazy or stupid. If I was I would have never listed or explained the 2 ways of planting a seed the way I did, Had I been to lazy or to stupid to use google I would have simply came to the board and in a 1 sentence question I would have asked
I have an Avocado seed, How do I get it to grow?
I didn't do that, I researched, Shared what I had found in that research and then asked people who may have had hands on experience if there were any successes or failures with either method I found through that research. If I was wrong to ask a question then I truly apologize to everyone. But my view has always been when you stop asking questions you stop learning.
I apologize to the group for snapping back at the poster, But I don't appreciate being talked down to. If I feel someone is taking a shot at me, I'm gonna shoot back. Steve
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Shystev99) wrote:

You don't owe anyone an apology... ;-) In my book, he was being rather rude! If he'd wanted to help, he'd have posted a few useful links from google to prove his point. <Grins>
Now back to your question, even tho' the one I finally got to grow died, I planted it directly in a pot and stuck it out on the north side of the house where it got east and west sun in the morning and evening. I left the top exposed and gave it good drainage. It eventually got planted in the ground but we get freezes here so that is probably why I lost it. I tried to protect it with leaf filled cages but that apparantly was not good enough...
And no, this browser has no spell checker so please forgive.
Mom and dad sprouted many of them with the toothpick and water method, but I don't recall them ever getting a tree out of them. :-)
Planting a whole, rotting avocado would probably work better. That really is the whole point of a plant making fruit! Not for us humans to eat, but to either provide fertilizer for the new seed, or, to encourage animals to eat the fruit, thus spreading the progeny when the animal drops the non-digestible seed out on the ground in a pile of animal fertilizer. ;-)
K.
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Actually, plants make edible fruit for the purpose of seed dissemination. Animals pick up the fruit and carry them away from the original tree. In some cases, the seeds are swallowed and later deposited right along with a little pile of fertilizer. This happens mostly with birds, but there are some mammals that also disseminate seeds in their poop.
In the case of something that has a pit, the animal in question generally drags the fruit away to eat elsewhere, but doesn't swallow the pit.
In the case of nuts, the tree grossly overproduces. The nuts that the squirrel buries but never digs up is the nut that grows.
You may notice that fruit tends to be sour or bitter before the seeds are mature. They are generally inconspicuous, too. It's only after the seeds are ready that the fruit ripens and changes color to attract the animals.
Ray Drouillard
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I think I kinda sorta said that, but you put it much better. <G> "spreading the progeny" is the way I had meant that.

Yah. Ever seen racoon poop full of wild persimmon seeds?

Gods. I know. I have been digging up and cutting up pecan trees all over the yard due to squirrels and a tree down the street!

Neat post. :-) Well stated.
K.

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x-no-archive: yes
<snip>

<snip>
I live in the San Francisco Bay Area (Sunset Zone 16/17, USDA Zone 9) and there are avocado trees (with fruit) around my neighborhood. I've found a couple of healthy avocado seedlings (one in an outdoor pot, one in the ground) near the house, likely planted by squirrels who probably mistook the pits for black walnuts from another tree nearby. ;-)
A nice site to visit is http://www.avocado.org , for tips on home avocado culture.
-- dkra
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In article <pottedmeatproduct-1402041127210001@dialup-67.74.38.225.dial1.sanfrancis co1.level3.net>, snipped-for-privacy@ix.netcom.com (dkra) wrote:

I envy you... ;-) I don't really have an ideal climate for Avocados!
Am planning tho' on building a greenhouse, and maybe trying to dwarf an avocado, and maybe a lemon tree.
Thanks for the link!
K.
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<snip>

Squirrels hereabouts don't worry about waiting for things to ripen! I bought an apricot years ago.. sweet heart I think.. that had an almond like pit with the apricot fruit. I never saw a one of them, squirrels cut every one of them, and it had a heavy load of fruit on it, off the tree while they were green.
Chickens roosting in the tree split the tree, and I didn't even attempt to save any of it because I knew that I'd never get anything from it with squirrels around.
Ah hates squirrels! I need a herd of trained Maine Coon Cats .. trained to catch and dispatch squirrels to the "nut house beyond!"
Janice
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Border collie, or whippets. ;-)
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On Thu, 12 Feb 2004 01:41:58 -0600, Katra

No doggies, they just bark up the trees and soon become neurotic and run out and bark bark bark at the base of trees even when there are no squirrels. Cats just go get 'em!
Janice
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Guess it depends on the doggy... ;-) I had a whippet named Mark that killed _lots_ of squirrels, and my border collie has been killing rats.
She has tried to get the tree squirrels, but just has not been quite quick enough.
Cats I think are variable. One of my best hunters, Tigger, used to kill my pigeons which is why he got exiled to being an indoor cat. <G> He never did kill any squirrels.
Used to have a gray tabby female tho' in california that left squirrel parts on the front porch for me to step in on a regular basis. :-P
Rabbits too. She was quite the little hunter! :-)
Her name was Patience.
K.
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