Single sockets


Is there any reason why I shouldn't replace the 3 single sockets in my house with doubles?
I assume I can easily (and legally!) do it myself?
Why would anybody install single sockets in the first place?
--
Steve





Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's easy enough, I did one of ours. I don't know about the legal side of it. I did it while the neighbours were out, seeing as it was on the wall betwen us and them, and it does involve hammering lumps out of the wall.

They're cheaper.
Steve(not you, the other one)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
shazzbat wrote:

Have a look at: http://tinyurl.com/a3sp3
Terry D.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 21 Nov 2005 09:14:06 -0000, "Steve Rainbird"

Assuming they are set into the wall, you will need three double wall boxes and sockets.
Chisel the hole for the new boxes on either side of the old one, so the wires will still enter the new box in the same place as the old one. Remove the old boxes by bashing the box into the empty hole with an old chisel and pull it out.
The problem will be the length of the existing wires in the hole fitting into the new socket.
Alternatively, get double adapters for the single boxes and make it a few minutes work.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Adaptors are a good idea I will look into it.
If I decide to go the original way and the wires are too short is there a way of extending them I.e some kind of connectors?
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 21 Nov 2005 14:46:38 -0000, "Steve Rainbird"

save time.
As to extending cable, not an area I know much about. I know it seems to involve a ratchet crimper and those cable crimps, but it has to be done properly.
I would remove the sockets and see how long the connections available are.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I chiselled the hole out half either side so that the cable entry went into the same place and the cables fitted. The box which goes into the wall has multiple panels you can knock out so the cable goes in where you want.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Regards
Micky.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Adam
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
ARWadsworth wrote:

in two 13A devices, but the next person may not.
JW
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The IEE allow double sockets on unfused spurs.
I think a little common sense applies. A double on a spur that feeds an alarm clock and light in a bedroom is not going to see 6 kW of power used. In a kitchen a double may be used for the tumble drier and dishwasher and so may use up to 26 amps. Depending upon how the spur cable is installed this may cause problems (it also may affect the design of the ring with an inbalanced load).
Adam
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.