Outline Planning Permission


I am looking at the possibility of selling a property with a plot of land attached. The plot itself is just over half an acre and would make a fantastic building plot, with open country aspects on three side.
Arcane local council restrictions mean the land cannot be sold separately, and must be sold with the house. Any new-builds in the village are restricted to immediate family of village residents, and the village residents themselves (three year rule?).
Anyway, I am looking for details on how much it would cost to have a professional prepare an outline planning application for a bog standard timber framed 3 of 4 bed property on the building plot, with a view to then selling the the existing house and adjoining land with the outline consent.
Also, does anyone have any experience of the relative costs and benefits of going for detailed planning consent (as opposed to outline), with a view to then selling the existing house and adjoining land with this consent?
I have considered doing the application myself, but am wary of a particularly stingy planning office, and a beaurocratic process which seems to put obstacles at every turn (new builds can be a sensitive subject given the areas National Park status, and they don't make it easy)
Cheers for any advice.
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But what use would OPP be to the new owner, cos they (presumably) couldn't sell separately either? Their only option would be to rent it out - for ever?
You say you can't sell the land without the house, but can you sell the house without the land?
As for costs - can vary enormously - especially if you get into appeals etc... Given the other restrictions you've mentioned, strongly recommend you get good advice about prospects of getting OPP _before_ incurring big fees.
--
Martin

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Local paper often has ads for surveyors offering to draw up plans. Be aware thanks to Commisar Prescott, Councils, such as mine, can now also demand an Enviromental Impact Assessment; cost around 16k currently.
Previously this was restricted to Developers; just another way to cane taxpayers.
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Local paper often has ads for surveyors offering to draw up plans. Be aware thanks to Commisar Prescott, Councils, such as mine, can now also demand an Enviromental Impact Assessment; cost around 16k currently.
Previously this was restricted to Developers; just another way to cane taxpayers.
Not true - was never restricted to 'developers' - the need for an EIA arises from the type & scale of development & sensitivity of the locality, not the nature of the aoolicant (householder / developer). Developing a single plot is v.unlikely to trigger the need for an EIA: talk to your council or better still write to them asking for a 'screening opinion' (opinion as o whether an EIA is needed).
Goin back to original post, I don't see any way in which the council can prevent you selling anything.
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newly built house (which is governed by the three year rule) and sell the existing house (which isn't). Live in the new house for three years, then you can sell that too. The rules make capitalising on the land difficult, but not insurmountable.
Having said that, i'm not inclined to do it myself, but OPP would make it a more attractive proposition for a buyer who is inclined to put the work in. Hence the query.
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