How important is water pipe earth bonding?


I have lived in my current house, which was built in the mid 1970s, for around twenty years. The water pipes have never been earth bonded.
I recently had my old fuse box replaced with a consumer unit and, as part of the job, the electrician fed an earth cable through into the downstairs cloakroom, where the mains water comes into the house, and bonded it onto the incoming cold water copper pipe. He also 'cross bonded' all the copper piping below my new combi which is installed in the attached garage.
It was not until he had left that it suddenly occurred to me that 12 months ago I had completely refurbished my bathroom, removing the old airing cupboard and replacing it with a shower cubicle. Most of the hot and cold water pipes in the bathroom required re-routing and so I replaced them all with plastic piping. The incoming cold water supply, and the hot water supply from the combi in the garage, enter the house via the downstairs cloakroom, and then go up into the bathroom, and from there down into the kitchen.
Because I have replaced the hot and cold piping in the bathroom with plastic piping, there is no earthing continuity between the bonding point and the kitchen (and no easy way to by-pass the plastic piping in the bathroom now either!)
So, how important is it that the water pipes in the kitchen are earth bonded - and is there an alternative to getting an earth bonding back to the consumer unit from the kitchen?
Ret.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Ret." <xxx> wrote in message

And so he should. Main equipotential bonding is required (google it or ask for more info)

Ask for some of your money back. Your new CU is fitted to the 17th edition regulations and supplementary bonding (AKA cross bonding) is no longer required.

It is not important at all with your new CU. Even under the last regs then only bathrooms and shower rooms needed the supplementary bonding. Boilers and kitchens never needed supplementary bonding

HTH
Adam
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
ARWadsworth wrote:

Thanks for that - I won't bother trying a work-around then!
Ret.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Ret." <xxx> wrote in message

Have you sorted the lighting out yet?
Adam
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
ARWadsworth wrote:

I've decided not to bother. The only downside (SFAICS) in relation to having both upstairs and downstairs lighting on the same protected circuit is that a 'trip' will put all the house lights out. But in our main room (the lounge) we rarely have the ceiling lights on. We use a modern lamp standard plugged into the mains - and wall lights which are on a fused spur taken from the mains - so we would still have lighting. The effort involved in resolving a problem that is not really a problem is more than it's worth I think.
Ret.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Ret." <xxx> wrote in message

Ret.
Have a read of
<http://www.voltimum.co.uk/news/9088/consult.experts_hottopics.17thedition/The-17th-Edition---Special-Locations---bathrooms-and-showers.html
Adam
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
ARWadsworth wrote:

<http://www.voltimum.co.uk/news/9088/consult.experts_hottopics.17thedition/The-17th-Edition---Special-Locations---bathrooms-and-showers.html
That was very interesting Adam. I'm further puzzled, however, by your insistence that there is no earth bonding required in the kitchen. SFAICS, under the 17th Edition, there is a need for main equipotential bonding to the incoming water pipe on the 'house' side of the main water stop-cock. (Which is what my electrician has recently done). I am assuming that the understanding is that by making this connection, the copper piping throughout the house is protected via this earth bond. In my case, because of the plastic piping I have put into my bathroom, the kitchen piping is separated from the earth bonding and is therefore unearthed. Although I can see that there is normally now no need for additional supplementary earth bonding in the kitchen - is it not the case that the kitchen piping *should* be earthed via the main equipotential bond? In my case, because it isn't, is there not a need to use earth bonding to by-pass the plastic piping in the bathroom to electrically 're-join' the kitchen piping to the earthed piping on the consumer-unit side of the bathroom?
Ret.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Ret." <xxx> wrote in message

Not quite. Yes the incoming metal supply needs to be main bonded. Only bath/shower rooms needed the supplementary bonding. It does not mater what room the incoming supply is in it still needs main equipotential bonding. I know that it is usually in the kitchen.
In my case, because

There is actually no such thing as "earth bonding". Your pipes (other than the incoming supply) in the kitchen need not be connected to earth.

Can I get back to you later with a better reply and explaination as I have just done a 13 hours hard slog at work? I need a shower and I need a rest:-)
Adam
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
ARWadsworth wrote:

. LOL! Yes, of course - sorry to be bothering you like this! Incidentally, the incoming water supply is via a plastic pipe. The first foot or so of pipe coming up out of the floor in the downstairs cloakroom is plastic - it is only copper from the 'house' side of the stop-cock.
Ret.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.