Double Glazing & Extractor Fans ?


I have absolutely no where in the kitchen to fit an extractor fan. Walls on either side of the door and windows is about 4". Above the windows, can't be fitted there, because of the lintels.
Is it possible therefore, to fit an extractor fan into double cglazed windows.
I know I can't do it, but if I tell the double glazing supplier what I want, is it possible ?
Kindest regards,
Jim
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the_constructor wrote:

supplier that installed it.
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As stated, yes, very easy. Basically they cut a hole in each pane of glass and fit a metal edge seal around the hole.
Fit a decent fan (Xpelair or Ventaxia) and do not overtighten when fitting. That way you do not risk damaging the seal or breaking the thin panes of glass more often than necessary.
If you have not already bought the extractor... Xpelair GX6 are great for airflow & reliability - leave running overnight in the summer to pull cool air into the house. Somewhat better is a GX9 which has a ability with a controller to intake air, making forced intake of cool air overnight in summer very easy. Xpelair come with two types of shutter - mechanical "bang-bang" with a pullcord, electronic either by remote-trimmer (light, humidistat) or pullcord. The electronic shutter with pullcord is GXC6T which is quite rare and has an adjustable run- on timer. The mechanical type if tugged too hard can break and the part is probably 12-20 delivered (not cheap). The electronic pull- cord type are longer lasting. They use an internal timer so are L+N+E, there is no external trigger so can be wired with a DP Isolator. Do not fall into the idiot trap of thinking "it must use a 3-pole isolator" and switching the Earth, the 3-pole are L1+L2+N with L2 being the trigger from (say) a lighting circuit or humidistat.
Never tried the Humidistat version of the GX6/9 fans - or rather I did, but it would not turn on. I could not figure out how it sensed humidity with the vent shut and no means of external humidity being drawn in, nor could Xpelair tell me how either when I telephoned them and told me to buy the GXC6T which had the electronic shutter (it's a wax pellet & spring).
Sadly I must also add that window fans are not as good as cooker hood extractors, so go for a "proper Brand" 6-inch as the minimum. As a guide a cheap cooker hood is 220-250m3/hr which is equivalent to a 6- inch window fan, whereas a good twin-fan cooker hood is 450-550m3/hr which is equivalent to a 9-inch window fan. Most people having tried a twin-fan cooker hood would not go back to single, because once you get beyond about 400m3/hr it eliminates all odour and condensation problems very quickly indeed.
The only alternative is a dehumifier like an Amber Dry or X-Dry. These are great in that they a) heat the kitchen b) remove moisture very effectively even at very low temperatures and c) do not blow all that heat outside. Unfortunately out of curiosity when I tried one it proved too slow to prevent chronic steaming up and whilst it retained the heat in the kitchen it actually got far too hot despite being -4oC outside with a howling icy wind (last winter). Nice idea, perhaps someone has tried it for longer or stuck a heat pump on dehumidifier mode in their kitchen which tend to be extremely powerful :-)
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As stated, yes, very easy. Basically they cut a hole in each pane of glass and fit a metal edge seal around the hole.
Fit a decent fan (Xpelair or Ventaxia) and do not overtighten when fitting. That way you do not risk damaging the seal or breaking the thin panes of glass more often than necessary.
If you have not already bought the extractor... Xpelair GX6 are great for airflow & reliability - leave running overnight in the summer to pull cool air into the house. Somewhat better is a GX9 which has a ability with a controller to intake air, making forced intake of cool air overnight in summer very easy. Xpelair come with two types of shutter - mechanical "bang-bang" with a pullcord, electronic either by remote-trimmer (light, humidistat) or pullcord. The electronic shutter with pullcord is GXC6T which is quite rare and has an adjustable run- on timer. The mechanical type if tugged too hard can break and the part is probably 12-20 delivered (not cheap). The electronic pull- cord type are longer lasting. They use an internal timer so are L+N+E, there is no external trigger so can be wired with a DP Isolator. Do not fall into the idiot trap of thinking "it must use a 3-pole isolator" and switching the Earth, the 3-pole are L1+L2+N with L2 being the trigger from (say) a lighting circuit or humidistat.
Never tried the Humidistat version of the GX6/9 fans - or rather I did, but it would not turn on. I could not figure out how it sensed humidity with the vent shut and no means of external humidity being drawn in, nor could Xpelair tell me how either when I telephoned them and told me to buy the GXC6T which had the electronic shutter (it's a wax pellet & spring).
Sadly I must also add that window fans are not as good as cooker hood extractors, so go for a "proper Brand" 6-inch as the minimum. As a guide a cheap cooker hood is 220-250m3/hr which is equivalent to a 6- inch window fan, whereas a good twin-fan cooker hood is 450-550m3/hr which is equivalent to a 9-inch window fan. Most people having tried a twin-fan cooker hood would not go back to single, because once you get beyond about 400m3/hr it eliminates all odour and condensation problems very quickly indeed.
The only alternative is a dehumifier like an Amber Dry or X-Dry. These are great in that they a) heat the kitchen b) remove moisture very effectively even at very low temperatures and c) do not blow all that heat outside. Unfortunately out of curiosity when I tried one it proved too slow to prevent chronic steaming up and whilst it retained the heat in the kitchen it actually got far too hot despite being -4oC outside with a howling icy wind (last winter). Nice idea, perhaps someone has tried it for longer or stuck a heat pump on dehumidifier mode in their kitchen which tend to be extremely powerful :-)
My sincerest thanks for all the information. I think the best thing to do is ask the DG fitter to fit the fan for me that way if the glass breaks then it is his responsibility and not mine. I shall be running the fan from a plug socket about 2 foot from the window that way I can get around Part P, plus SWMBO will be happy that the wall has not to be chased out for any cables. We have a deep fat frier near to the winodw and at the moment, before we have the new windows fitted, we have an opening light which the wife, bless her she's 4'8" can't reach, so I thought of the extractor fan idea. Now off to do some more research..
Thanks again, Jim
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the_constructor wrote:

My local glaziers can fit cat flaps into double glazed units on site. They dismantle the unit, cut the holes & reasemble it. Don't spose its cheap though.
--
Dave - The Medway Handyman
www.medwayhandyman.co.uk
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"The Medway Handyman" wrote:

That can be done on glass that has not been toughened but a bottom glass door panel will be toughened glass so will shatter if any attempt is made to cut it. The two options are to either get the DG company to make a sealed unit with the hole cut out for the cat flap then get the glass toughened, or have a upvc panel cut to size with an aperture for the cat flap.
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"the_constructor" wrote:

If the glass is not toughened then a hole can be cut on site. If the glass is toughened a new DG unit will need to me made, a hole cut, then toughened, then fitted into the frame. Height above floor level that determines whether it is a 'critical location' and therefore must have safety/toughened glass is as follows:
Any glazing or part of that glazing, which is between the finished floor level and a height of 800mm above the floor level, is in a 'critical location'.
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wrote:

No more of a nonsense as putting a letter box in a doubleglazed door.... or airvents in the tops of doubleglazed windows to comply with gas regs
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