utilizing old well & septic system

I just purchased 20 acres w/old farm house. There is an existing well and septic system towards the front of the property close to the old farm house. We are looking at locating a new modular home towards the middle or rear of the property. The property is approx. 1000 ft. deep. What are the chances of utilizing either or both of these systems for the new house? The well and septic are in good shape and adequate for a single family dwelling now but I don't know if they will work for the new home which we would like to set back 600-800 ft. from the front of the property. I would appreciate anyone with knowledge in these areas to respond. Thank You, Jack Kuusisto snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com
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bodega wrote:

Well should be no real problem to run a supply line and trench plus line could well be cheaper than new well.
Septic/sewer essentially no chance unless it's well downhill from where your new site is -- otherwise, it won't be low enough to get the fall needed. Plus, such a long lateral drainage line would inevitabley be a pita from roots, etc.
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Run the water for a 100 gallons or so to be sure you're getting water from the well, not plumbing. Do a flow check during that time to estimate gallons per hour through a 3/4" adapter piping. Run to a 5 gallon bucket and time it to fill. The primary feed pipe at the house will most likely be 3/4". Then, downsize using standard 1/2" garden hose and do another gallons/hour flow check if the potential house will use 1/2" feed pipe. Use a 1/2" to 1/4" adapter to estimate water flow if you intend to use standard 1/4" feed tubes at kitchen, bathtub, or bath sinks. Use a sealed uncontaminated container to take a water sample to a local university for testing. While you're at the university, ask for instructions for containerizing water for off gases. Get that sample checked.
The primary drain pipe at the house has to be higher 1/4" per foot distance to the septic tank. Excessive incline will leave solids in the drain piping. Dump about 50 gallons of water on the solids side of the tank. If it doesn't dissipate to the effluent field in a short time, you may have problems in short, major bursts of water waste from the house. For instance, flushing 2 toilets, draining 2 bathtubs, drain from a washer, drain from dishwasher, and the kitchen sink at almost the same time.
A single family dwelling may mean a 1000 sq ft home with 2 bedrooms, with one bath, one kitchen and dishwasher, and washer/dryer room with minimal irrigation demands of a very small yard. It may also mean a 4000 sq foot home with 6 bedrooms, 4 baths, a wet bar, a large kitchen with 2 double sinks, a laundry room that houses a washer and a deep sink, 3 Jacuzzis in 3 baths, 2 bathtubs in 2 baths, a sauna room, a swimming pool, a hot tub, and 10 acres of lawn with intermittent water spigots every acre and auto irrigation. Lots of difference for water requirements and waste drainage. Well replenishment depends on the rainfall, runoff, availability of acreage that feeds that well to absorb the water (may not be your acreage), others that may be sourcing the same water area as you, man-made buildings, parking lots, and roads that may cover the above ground acreage that feeds your well. A minimum septic tank size depends on the what's feeding it and how much. The effluent field may require a pump to feed it if not much lower, level, or higher than the septic tank outlet side.
But you said "The well and septic are in good shape and adequate for a single family dwelling". Which seems to be your intentions. So don't understand what you are looking for.
--
Jonny



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