Replacing old single pane with double pane windows

Hey guys, got a question. I have just aquired a 40 year old house and have found that the single pane windows have been sweating over the years. The inside window frames are in terrible shape and need replaceing. I have plans on replacing the old windows(single pane) with some new double pane windows. i have asked around and have been getting some confusing answers when it comes to the best window for the best price, anywhere from $150.00 to more than $500.00 per window. Can anybody give me a brand name that they have used that is a good window for the price? Thanks
"BEAR' South Louisiana
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I think your first problem will be finding replacement window sash that fit the existing openings. You may have to either change the openings or buy custom sash. Check your opening sizes and get bids from a couple of sources for those sizes. If the bids are more than you want, consider changing opening sizes. T
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wrote:

windows in two of my houses (over 100 years old) using local window manufacturers and suppliers. Look around, there are many window manufacturers in historic areas that build to existing openings for reasonable rates. You might not get aluminum or vinyl facing, but you will get double glazing. EDS
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Best window for the price is highly subjective and I won't go there. Good names are Anderson. ... Pella(Lowe's ...) look good too. I saw a Quaker window the other day and the construction was great and price was competitive.
The difference you are probably finding is the diff between new construction and replacement windows. Good, insulated, low-E, vinyl, 36x36, 'new construction' windows can be had for $150. A replacement window will be twice that or more depending on the window size. Replacement windows are 'custom' windows that will fit into your existing opening, hence they cost more. If you have a standard size, unlikely for a 60's house, the replacement window won't cost a lot more than new construction.
I have a 57 year-old house that is getting new windows in a month or so. Since I am also residing and can have a new frame for them, I am going to buy "new construction" windows. The new windows will be smaller than these monsters(~39x60), in most places, which will make the job easier. ... The diff in cost for me is ~ 300 per window. I'll save almost $3000 using new construction windows.
If your siding is easy to get, you might consider a similar approach - putting a smaller window in the same opening after reframing it so new construction window can be nailed from the outside to the frame. Then just add new siding up to the new window. I was going to do that but 8" aluminum siding is not easy to get and there are other issues that need to be resolved (e.g., add insulation and wrap exterior...). You might have better luck with your siding.
Oh yea, if you cannot do the carpentry to frame the "new construction" window, the cost savings is probably a wash - might as well buy ''replacement'' windows.
HopeThatHelps...
bear wrote:

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