PVC pipe experiment

I want to make a simple triangle using nothing but PVC pipe. Using wood it is simple and easy to make. Just cut the boards to length, cut the angles and nail. The angle for each triangle corner is 60 degrees. Then comes the problem of how to join the ends. For my purposes, building a geodesic dome model, simple glue won't cut it.
Any one have any ideas on how to do this?
Can PVC be heated to make a bend as you can do with copper pipe without losing the integrity of the material?
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On Sun, 7 Aug 2011 22:40:32 -0400, richard wrote:

well I've answered my own question of bending pvc pipe. with a product like pipe viper, it's a quick and easy DIY thing.
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richard wrote:

Andy comments: I got curious and google it. It looks to me like 90deg is the max angle. How do you plan to get the extra 30 deg to end up with a 60 deg interior angle ????
Andy in Eureka, Texas
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On Mon, 08 Aug 2011 01:03:16 -0700, AndyS wrote:

Now look at the numerous images found. You'll see a few that have angles similar to a coat hanger. So apparently the pvc pipe could be bent practically back onto itself forming an almost 180 degree bend.
A simple wood jig would help create the needed angle.
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richard wrote:

Andy responds
Yeah, it looks to me like the pipe viper could do the 90, and then a wood jig could do the rest, after the viper is removed. I would put it in the oven at maybe 170 or so to soften it.
I've used the oven before, and it works, but I've never tried to do a 60..... It would only take a few minutes to try with a piece of scrap without the pipe viper.....
Well,,,,, good luck
Andy in Eureka, Texas
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AndyS wrote the following:

The usual method would be to fill the pipe with sand before bending. This helps to keeps the pipe (metal or plastic) from collapsing at the bend. (The responder is a former US Navy Metalsmith)
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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On Tue, 09 Aug 2011 00:05:45 -0400, willshak wrote:

That was what I read on one website. What if you filled the pipe with fairly warm water? Like around 150 deg. or so?
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willshak wrote:

Andy comments: Thanks for posting that..... It's always good to hear the tricks of the trade from a professional.....
I have a lot of sand available.....Maybe I'll try it tomorrow in the oven, just for the heck of doing the experiment..... If it works well, the trick will really come in handy now and then.....
Andy in Eureka, Texas
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In addition to using sand, you can make a simple bend fixture to hold the pipe while it cools
http://www.mildevco.net/pvc_mdf_template.jpg
couple of pieces of MDF glued and nailed together, and a good fan to cool the pipe. Only one corner is shown, but if the triangles you want to make are small enough, you can make all three bends at once.
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