Pool nightmare

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The house was already constructed, but... http://realestate.aol.com/blog/2011/06/20/real-estate-disclosure-what-you-dont-know-can-hurt-you/?icid=maing-grid7 |main5|dl3|sec1_lnk2|71747 or: http://preview.tinyurl.com/3tjdomg
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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On 6/20/2011 1:25 PM, willshak wrote:

http://realestate.aol.com/blog/2011/06/20/real-estate-disclosure-what-you-dont-know-can-hurt-you/?icid=maing-grid7 |main5|dl3|sec1_lnk2|71747
Except for the person who buried the crap, who knows, or who could have known. It is even possible that when the stuff was buried it was legal to do so, and in that case, the current owner has little recourse at all. However the article seems to indicate a variety of hard items, mostly metal, not garbage, so leaving it buried likely won't hurt anyone.
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I've always wanted to take all my wife's crafts/scrapbooking/rubber stamps/pottery crap and bury it in a big hole in the backyard. This really motavates me.
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"so" wrote in message

If you follow through on this, and then notice your wife has taken to reading murder mysteries in which husbands end up buried in their own back yards, don't say you weren't warned.
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But I am thinking if you don't and she is found, the disclosure is going to be least of your worries.
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People thought cybersex was a safe alternative,
until patients started presenting with sexually
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willshak wrote:

http://realestate.aol.com/blog/2011/06/20/real-estate-disclosure-what-you-dont-know-can-hurt-you/?icid=maing-grid7 |main5|dl3|sec1_lnk2|71747
It can happen. I was once invited to invest in a sand pit.
The promoter said the said had already been sold and would be paid for as it was removed. But that was not the selling point. What made the deal attractive, according to him, was the tax provisions.
You see, he explained, as you remove the sand you are depleting a mineral asset and you get a tax deduction. But that's only part of the scheme.
When the sand is gone, you have a big honkin' hole in the ground. Now you charge people to dump stuff in the hole (concrete, tree trunks, washing machines, whatever). But the real money-maker is this: you have an asset (the hole), you're filling it up (with junk), thereby depleting an asset once again!
My brain was going dizzy, but he continued: "Wait, there's more!"
"When the hole is almost full, you cover everything with about two feet of topsoil and sell the acreage for a low-cost housing subdivision!"
I passed.
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This burying of trash was and still may be a common practice of Farmers. They typically dig a huge hole on their property and start filling it for years until it fills up. Then they dig another one.
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On 6/20/2011 6:08 PM, snipped-for-privacy@mucks.net wrote:

Done all the time. And not illegal.
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Steve Barker
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On 6/20/2011 12:25 PM, willshak wrote:

http://realestate.aol.com/blog/2011/06/20/real-estate-disclosure-what-you-dont-know-can-hurt-you/?icid=maing-grid7 |main5|dl3|sec1_lnk2|71747
well, duh. they put yuppie subdivisions on top of landfills all the time.
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Steve Barker
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underground information. So you could end up overlooking a lot of potential problems. Up here in the cold north minimum depth is 4 feet, many foundations go 5 to 7 feet deep to allow for a basement.
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On 6/20/2011 8:50 PM, EXT wrote:

Well, in Florida I've seen houses built with even less that 12" footings. Without any frost issues, the only thing important is stability (lack of cracks)...
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On 6/20/2011 7:50 PM, EXT wrote:

I'm a wondering two things: 1. what lo life jurisdiction only requires a 12" footing? 2. What dumass would build a house without a basement? It's only a couple thousand more than a crawl or a slab.
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Southern half of Florida. No frost heave. Lots of areas are not good places to build basements. Areas with poor drainage or water close to the surface. Like Florida. You do not find many here in NC either. Poor drainage and lots of heavy rain. A few where the land slopes enough that most of the basement is out of the ground anyway. Don't make assupmtions based on your locality.
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On 6/21/2011 9:27 AM, jamesgangnc wrote:

I'm not making any assumptions at all. It's just commonsense to build a basement. regardless of soil conditions. It's all workable. AND the IBC requires footings to be deeper than 12" regardless of location.
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There are many places in Florida where if you dig 4 feet down your hole will fill up with water. A basement in those conditions is just plain stupid. You can't solve that with drainage. It's not "workable".
And building codes are local, not ibc. Ibc is a model that local juristictions can start from. They adapt as needed. Since there are no geological issues or frost in southern florida they don't need a deep footing. What's under the footing in florida is almost always sand. You dig deeper you just find more sand. So it's not like you can dig to a more stable stratum either. And if you dig too deep and your footing starts filling up with water now you've got a headache on your hands.
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jamesgangnc wrote:

Same in all of south Texas. There must be a million homes in the greater Houston area and maybe six have basements. First, its at least 500' before you get to a stable rock formation - 'til then it's damp clay. Secondly, land is relatively cheap (compared to, say, Philadelphia), so homes tend to move out (sometimes up) to generate square feet.
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On 6/21/2011 10:43 AM, Steve Barker wrote:

Only for you, which makes it less common than one might expect. Many, many places don't build basements, and there are good reasons to not do so. As well, there are few advantages and many disadvantages to basements in many places, including increased costs over a simple slab.

I have to ask WHY? They are not necessary in that location...
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Steve Barker wrote the following:

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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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willshak wrote the following:

Footnote "a" of Table 1805.4.2 refers to Section 1805.2 for footing depth, which specifies a minimum footing depth of 12 inches or the depth of the frost line, whichever is deeper. There are exceptions for Occupancy Category I buildings or buildings sited on solid bedrock.
There is no frost line set for Florida since the average frost depth is 6 inches or less.
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On 6/22/2011 8:20 AM, willshak wrote:

I can see that if it isn't built properly with the proper drainage and sumps. Goes for ANY basement.
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