Mold control in new construction

As a follow-up to a previous post: There's a product called Concrobium Mold Control (manufactured in Toronto) which can be used to "inoculate" new wood frame construction against subsequent mold formation. Instructions say it will provide about 400 square feet of coverage per gallon. My son and I are going to spray it (and let it dry thoroughly) in the stud bays of his new house prior to insulating. Price is approx. $33/ gallon.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I posted a reply to this yesterday - not sure why it's not showing up. I'll recap the highlights.
Active ingredient in Concrobium (single worst product name) is sodium carbonate, aka washing soda. It's laundry detergent stuff and cheap. The Concro stuff is 0.5% sodium carbonate and has a boiling point of 212 F - that's water.
In other words you'd be getting hosed if you bought that stuff. Make your own. You could probably use baking soda as a substitute.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

To illustrate how much they're overcharging for the Conco stuff... http://www.soapsgonebuy.com/Arm_and_Hammer_Washing_Soda_p/ah1001.htm About five bucks for a four pound box. For that, you could probably make fifty gallons of solution, or $1500 worth of Concro. Five bucks and some stirring, or $1500 so you don't have to mix anything and you get some packaging.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 09 Jun 2007 18:15:31 -0700, RicodJour

According to the Canadian MSDS sheet, it's actually 1.19% trisodium phosphate. According to the American MSDS sheet it is 0.95% sodium carbonate. So the manufacturer makes 2 different but very similar products and calls it the same name.
Now the TSP you can buy in the hardware store may not be pure TSP but rather substituted with up to 80-90% sodium carbonate. The reason TSP is being cut down is that phosphates acts as a fertilizer to promote the growth of algae if it gets flushed into your plumbing.
From Wikpedia: "Trisodium phosphate (TSP), available at most hardware stores in white powder form, is a cleaning agent and degreaser, commonly used to prepare household surfaces for painting. In the early 1970s the use of phosphate-containing products was limited. Now products sold as TSP Substitute, containing 80-90% sodium carbonate, are promoted as a direct substitute.
Cleaning products labeled as TSP may contain other ingredients as well, and may in fact be less than half TSP. So even "regular" TSP found at the hardware store may be half TSP and half "TSP substitute". Savogran's brand actually contains 80% trisodium phosphate dodecahydrate."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sodium carbonate is used in the fruit industry to inhibit mold growth on fruit. By it's other name, washing soda, it is used in laundry and cleaning applications. No reason to use phosphates if you don't have to. There's no way you're getting TSP, whether nearly pure or purely adulterated, for anywhere near as low of a price as the washing soda.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have an interest in this idea too. How would you recommend using it?
Autumn
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Dear R,
You are mistaken if you think you can make "Concrobium" (i agree worst product name ever). If you think its just a mix of carbonate and water...The thing i like about Concrobium is that it has EPA and DIN registrations. Meaning relevant safety and efficacy data has been posted and proves Concrobium will kill and prevent mold. I used it many time with great results. A mixture of washing soda and water does not kill or prevent mold. The reason why the MSDS for Canada and US are different are because of the EPA and DIN requirements... As a mold pro, i know this stuff very well and have been satisfied with Concrobiums performance on the jobs i have done. hope this helps,
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Jun 12, 12:58 pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I appreciate the input, but it doesn't really change things. As a commercial applicator I'm sure you have the typical bureaucratic regulations to conform to, which would require you to provide an MSDS to the occupants when you applied whatever you were applying. That requirement precludes you from mixing your own chemicals - no matter how innocuous they are. As far as I know, if you can't provide an MSDS sheet, you can't use the chemical.
Concrobium _is_ just sodium carbonate and water. Sodium carbonate is listed on the US MSDS as the _only_ active ingredient. If sodium carbonate inhibits mold growth on fruit, it will inhibit mold growth on other things.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
replying to RicodJour, JJ wrote: That's a false equivalency. Soap will inhibit mold, so will vinegar as do many other substances. That does not make them equally substitutable for all applications. I'd listen to the professional and not put my house at risk. Products formulated to inhibit mold in construction are more than a 'bureaucratic regulation.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

IMO all these mold inhibitors are a marketing gimmick at best, and at worst, an industry diversionary tactic to make you think preventing LEAKS is less important. Keep the water out and you won't need to waste money on mold inhibitors which probably won't do the job anyway. The products that really rot if there are leaks are drywall and insulation, and those products should not be sprayed with wet applications or you will probably damage them.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Jun 12, 2:33 pm, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Spraying drywall (presumably already painted drywall) with a solution won't damage the drywall unless it's left soaking, and the spray is hardly soaking. Think of it this way, when you apply joint compound you're adding a _lot_ of water to unpainted drywall and it dries just fine with no damage.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Hello I am with Siamons International, the manufacturer of Concrobium Mold Control, and am writing to clear up some of the confusion about the product in the posts below. Concrobium Mold Control is a fungicide and fungistat, which means that it eliminates (kills) existing mold and prevents mold growth. There is only one type of Concrobium Mold Control - not a version that contains TSP and a version that contains Sodium Carbonate, as is suggested below. This confusion probably stems from the fact that we have different "active ingredients" listed on our US and Canadian Material Safety Data Sheets. The product contains both TSP and Sodium Carbonate, as well as a third ingredient (a salt), manufactured using our proprietary process. In fact, there is no single "active" ingredient in Concrobium Mold Control (we are required to list an "active" on all MSDS sheets). The small amounts of TSP and sodium carbonate, combined with the other ingredient (also non-toxic), results in a solution that, as it dries, forms a polymer that encapsulates and crushes mold. The patented solution stays on surfaces to continually resist mold growth. (Note: the antimicrobial industry is regulated. Manufacturers cannot make mold inhibition and prevention claims without thorough testing. Our Health Canada and EPA-registration are the consumer's assurance that the product does what we say it does.) I'd also like to point out that RicodJour is correct when he says that the key to mold control is water control. Mold only grows where there is excess water and humidity; control those conditions and you can avoid mold. Unfortunately, water and humidity intrusion do happen. Leaky pipes, natural flooding, condensation, etc. can lead to wet materials, which can lead to mold. In these cases, an antimicrobial solution can help to remediate existing mold and/or prevent mold growth. For more information about the product please visit the website at www.concrobium.com. Our email address is on the web site if you have any more questions. Thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
researcher had written this in response to http://www.www.thestuccocompany.com/construction/Re-Mold-control-in-new-construction-9317-.htm : Not that anyone is paying attention any more but here it is:
According to another aspect of the invention, there is provided a non- toxic water soluble inorganic polymer of the following general formula, wherein X is any alkali metal cation, preferably sodium cation or potassium cation:
illustrated on this website
http://patents.ic.gc.ca/cipo/cpd/en/patent/2604467/images.html?page=3&section scription&modificationDate 080109&scale%&rotation=0
Here is the formula:
An alkali solution of about 2% polymer and sodium bicarbonate (NHCO3), sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) and trisodium phosphate (Na3PO4) in a molar ratio of 1 :4:5 was used for each of the following examples. This alkali solution of polymer is referred to as Concrobium.
DO NOT TRY THIS AT HOME THIS IS A PATENT
Enjoy
------------------------------------- snipped-for-privacy@siamons.com wrote:

##-----------------------------------------------## Delivered via http://www.www.thestuccocompany.com/ Building Construction and Maintenance Forum Web and RSS access to your favorite newsgroup - alt.building.construction - 12443 messages and counting! ##-----------------------------------------------##
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
orchardsonoma had written this in response to http://www.thestuccocompany.com/construction/Mold-control-in-new-construction-9152-.htm : I might recommend Smith&Co. Mold and Mildew Eco-Blend #47. It is sold as a 3:1 concentrate and has a squeaky clean MSDS sheet. It works brilliantly by saturating the neighborhood of "small life" with harmless organic chemicals that makes everything taste and smell really bad to them (not us) for up to six months. Every other product is in the "killing game" and evaporates in a few days. Then organisms replicate again as a more resistant strain. This stuff is even safe for carpets and fabrics. Unlike others, no cheap ingredients are used like baking soda or plastics that encapsulate mold and leave a nasty film on fibers in carpets, etc. No protective gear required. Wash off like any household cleaner. If you want more data or technical assistance, go to annreynolds.com or smithandcompany.org before ordering. There are more products available for wood restoration and UV stabilized clear sealers for wood decking. mchappe wrote:

-------------------------------------
##-----------------------------------------------## Delivered via http://www.thestuccocompany.com/ Building Construction and Maintenance Forum Web and RSS access to your favorite newsgroup - alt.building.construction - 16966 messages and counting! ##-----------------------------------------------##
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.