metal fire door intallation (pre-hung type)

I am putting in three fire doors on interior fire walls in a garage. They have metal frames. They are the 90 min burn type. My questions are as follows:
It seems to me that the faces of the perimeter of the rough opening has to already have the fire code sheet rock on?
If so then what do I trim the outside of the door with to keep it fire code?
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I am a bit confused. There are three main types of metal jambs. If you tell me which you have, perhaps I can give you some advice on installation. One type of jamb is meant to be attached to the framing before the drywall. These jambs are usually welded together with no joints showing at the intersection of the side and header, though you can buy them as KD (knock down) jambs to be tabbed together on site. The drywall is forced into the jamb as it is installed on both sides of the door. This is the jamb you see in most commercial and public buildings. Here is an example: http://www.cecodoor.com/suframes.htm Another type of jamb is called a drywall frame. It is meant to be installed on a properly sized RO in three separate pieces and the miter is made up during the installation. These jambs are held in the opening by friction having push plates high on the sides and screw clips that are hidden by the baseboard. These jambs would have the drywall installed before installing the jamb, then the jamb is slipped onto the perimeter and the miters are made up as the jamb is installed. http://www.steelcraft.com/pc_frames_drywall.asp There is another type of jamb that is made of 3 sections that are installed and screwed to the finish drywall. These are usually installed after the wall is finish painted. There are separate trim pieces that are held on by clips on the jamb. These are seen in small office buildings and tenant spaces where walls are moved or changed often. http://www.timelyframes.com/frame/frames.htm
___________________________ Keep the whole world singing. . . . DanG

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Hmmmmm door number one? door number two? or door number three? I think it is number 2. The flanges on the frames are very thin that would cover the RO. They have enlongated slots on the flanges. The door though doesn't protrude beyond the wall to allow for dry wall later.

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Do you have a brand name? It sounds like a Timely type frame that is perhaps meant to be trimmed with the trim used in the rest of the house. It would be difficult, at best, to nail conventional trim to a metal jamb, though square drive self drilling screws would work. ___________________________ Keep the whole world singing. . . . DanG

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it is a Timely FAST-FRAME. I am assuming I will use the metal strips for trim but they look like they go on the opposite side of the "flange"... Because of the fire code issue I would think they would want something non-flammable?...

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