Help needed

Can anyone here help??
I need a link or information that will guide me in installing sheetrock on the ceiling of a room I have enclosed. The problem is that there is already plywood on the ceiling and I don't plan on removing it. This was a carport that I have enclosed. Anyway, I understand about placement of sheetrock, but since the plywood is currently installed in the way that the sheetrock is supposed to be installed, do I follow the plywood, or do I put in the sheetrock in what I would call is perpendicular to the way the ceiling members run?
The reason I do not want to remove the plywood is that there is blown in insulation in the attic which includes the part over the carport (now a new room)
Thanks so much
--
Sandra S. Beall
Huntsville Alabama
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I see little problem here. I would make sure the plywood is nailed up tight and I would try to not get my rock joints over a plywood joint (break them up). Still, put your joints on the joists, don't just screw to the plywood. Have at it!

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I really don't see any problem with screwing the drywall right to the plywood. as long as the plywood is attached sufficiently

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Chances are it is only 1/4", not solid enough to screw to.


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good point...
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I checked ... it is 1/4" cedar plywood... good quality, better than we get today. The house is approx . 50 years old. I have been told that these houses are well made compared to today's building. I noticed that it also has black felt paper between rafters and plywood.
It looks like they wrapped everything...
Sandra Beall
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50 years ago, I had been a full time carpenter for 7 years. I know the construction of yesterday and yes, it was better than now days. We were craftsman back then. Now they stand something up and where it stops moving, they nail it there. (Probably the one guy on the crew that speaks English knows what a level is.)
As for the plywood, being cedar, teak or whatever, it could be delaminating some from moisture even if it isn't apparent. Glues were not as good back then which sounds contradictory to the first paragraph but isn't.

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Hmmm, between it being cedar, only 1/4" and your delaminating comment, it sounds like skimcoating is not a good idea.
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Ran into your situation enclosed carport and all. Was gonna put sheetrock over it. Then figured what the heck, try it.
If nailed, go over with screws. Ran belt sander over the plywood to smooth...50 or 80 grit. Skimcoated ceiling with mud. Ran a circ saw blade at all seams to give 1/8" expansion room. Smoothed out mud and seam cuts by sanding. Taped and mudded seams. Smoothed out seams Do a 2nd+ coat (whatever it takes) seam taper just like drywall. Prime and painted with ceiling paint.
Looked like a regular ceiling to me! Sold house 6mos later so I don't know any long term results.
A lot of the above steps you have to do with drywall anyway but at least you don't have to buy & hang drywall...on a ceiling yet.
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The only problem with mud and wood is that they often don't adhere to each other and flakes of mud will drop off, or at minimum cracks can appear. I'm not saying that what will happen in your case, but in my experience this has happened. I recommend determining what thickness the plywood is, and if it's 3/8" or better, it may hold screws pretty well. Just make sure that you don't screw into pipes or electrical in the process. As mentioned lapping over the seams is a good idea, as the sheetrock can provided structural improvement too. In fact, keeping the plywood in place and sheetrocking over it will provide better structural strength, insulation, less moisture problems on the inside of the sheetrock, and better safety from fire.
Al Bundy wrote:

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Except when you don't want them to of course! :-)

Like I said. Can't speak for long term results. Surly I won't argue that putting the sheetrock over the plywood sounds like a better approach.

Hopefully can layout the sheetrock so that edges of existing plywood are in the field of the sheetrock.
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Sandra S Beall wrote:

Sandra, Most applications of sheetrock, but not all, call for it to be applied perpendicular to the framing members (trusses in your case). You may check the Gypsum Association catalog for more information.
Terry North Combination Building Inspector
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