Heater in Bathroom Panasonic Whisper Warm ?

Hello
I am about to have my bathroom remolded.
My wife would like to add a heater to the bathroom. The home has a forced air gas furnace and the batroom has a vent in it. We rarely turn the house heater on (live in SF bay area).
I noticed that Panasonic makes a WhisperWarm , which is a vent fan along with a heater.
Would this be a good way to go? I need to add a vent fan as part of the remodle.
Was wondering if there is a better way to install a heater?
How are the Red Hating Lamp Light Bulbs?
Or an Electric Wall mount heater?
Ideas?
Thanks
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First things first. Do NOT have your bathroom remolded. You should reuse the existing mold. It's cheaper that way. ;)
I like Panasonic fans, but I don't see the point in heating the air up by the ceiling. If you want to do it right, look into installing radiant heat under the floor tile. There are very few things in life that are nicer than stepping barefoot onto a nice warm floor, and none of those other things are legal.
Electric radiant is efficient for small areas, such as your bathroom, and it frees up wall and ceiling space. The only thing you'll see is the thermostat. If you get one of the programmable thermostats you can set it to turn the floor heat on a little while before you get up in the morning so you'll step onto that nice warm floor.
Warmly Yours is a good outfit to work with. http://www.warmlyyours.com/products/floor-heating/tile-and-stone /
R
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I agree. I am working on the second bathroom remodel using under tile electric heaters as an addition to the house heating. They don't use much electricity and can be controlled to only operate when you need it.
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Recycling old mold (as opposed to buying new) saves money and can be a wise investment. Be sure to install it into wet area to give it a good home.
Since I do work exclusively with the handicapped and the elderly, I know that you NEVER install anything that moves air around or through a bathroom (think wind chill factor). I always recommend radiant flooring systems or if that is not possible, radiant from above. Either way, it is a little more expensive on an operating basis than a gas FAU, but it is better for bathroom heat. I always recommend a programmable thermostat for heated floors since they are not instant on. Set them 20 minutes or so before you get up (depdnding on substrate), and have a nice toasty bathroom and shower floor ready to go.
Tim
wrote:

First things first. Do NOT have your bathroom remolded. You should reuse the existing mold. It's cheaper that way. ;)
I like Panasonic fans, but I don't see the point in heating the air up by the ceiling. If you want to do it right, look into installing radiant heat under the floor tile. There are very few things in life that are nicer than stepping barefoot onto a nice warm floor, and none of those other things are legal.
Electric radiant is efficient for small areas, such as your bathroom, and it frees up wall and ceiling space. The only thing you'll see is the thermostat. If you get one of the programmable thermostats you can set it to turn the floor heat on a little while before you get up in the morning so you'll step onto that nice warm floor.
Warmly Yours is a good outfit to work with. http://www.warmlyyours.com/products/floor-heating/tile-and-stone /
R
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It's probably not going to do what you want - the room will be cold when you enter and if the exhaust fan is running, the only warmth will come from direct radiation. Since you are remodeling, you may want to consider something like this as a solution:
http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productId247-14-170&lpage=none
It fits flush into the wall and operates by thermostat (builtin or separate). There are many similar choices to choose from, depending on the size of the room. Search for electric wall heater.
I installed one in a back corner bathroom that never seemed to get warm enough from the central heating. Set the thermostat just high enough to take the chill off the room, but not so high that you'd see a big electric hit.
It does draw current similar to a hair dryer, so you can't piggy back on a lighting circuit and need to be careful about a bath circuit since it's possible you'd have a hair dryer going the same time it was running. We had an unused 20A GFCI jet tub circuit available, so it was really easy to install.
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Toe kick heaters are nice. Also, you can put towel warmers in...........they are very nice.

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responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/construction/Heater-in-Bathroom-Panasonic-Whisper-Warm-16828-.htm stevez wrote: Although likely too late for the original poster, I read this post with interest, since I own one of the Panasonic vent/heaters mentioned here. I do not work in the industry or represent any similar products, but I can highly recommend the Panasonic. I replaced a Nutone model that was getting worn out when I remodeled my hall bathroom. It is not a large room, maybe 5' x 10', with 8' ceilings, but I have been very satisfied with both the heat and the fan operation. Both are extremely quiet--much quieter than the old one, and work very well. If you are a remodeling show junkie like me, maybe you have heard Mike Holmes mention them in passing. I think he tends to use high end stuff. I would love to have put in radiant floor heating, but that would involve ripping out the existing floor covering, and I believe you are somewhat limited on the type of flooring used. I think most people use tile. Not to mention the fact that it is rather expensive. I believe that the mat alone (similar to an electric blanket) for the bathroom I am talking about would have been in excess of $500. If you are not installing it yourself, then you can count on the cost of the new installed floor covering and the electrical. A friend of mine has it and loves it, but it recently stopped working in his rather large tiled bathroom. I assume one of the wires under the floor opened up, but I don't know the usual failure mode of these systems. The last I heard, he was planning to rip out all the tile and start looking for the problem. Fortunately, he can do the work himself, but still... Other notes about the Panasonic: It is not cheap. I believe I paid around $200. It is also larger than the one it replaced, so you will need to have access to the ceiling above it and enough clearance. Sorry for the wordiness, but I just wanted to add my 2 cents worth. SZ
Tube Audio wrote:

------------------------------------- SZ
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