can you seal a driveway pipe

Hi,
I have a ditch in the front yard that collects runoff and diverts it into a 12" concrete pipe that runs under the end of the driveway. It is probably about 30 years old. A man came out to look at an unrelated project, and looked at the pipe and said that it looked uneven or broken in the middle, but not to worry about it and to just fix it when I had to fix it. When the water flow is heavy water does flow out of the other end of the pipe.
I was wondering if there was some sort of sealing technique that was available, rather than digging up the driveway and replacing the pipe.
Thanks,
itchy
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internaughtfull wrote the following:

He's right. If it ain't broke, don't fix it.
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Bill

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Put in a new pipe inside the old. (smaller one) just a thought. I do know that they have machines that actually "pull" new pipes through existing......... With a metal cone and cable on other end..... It probably wont' work in this case.....not sure though. Just 2 ideas...... john
"internaughtfull" wrote in message
Hi,
I have a ditch in the front yard that collects runoff and diverts it into a 12" concrete pipe that runs under the end of the driveway. It is probably about 30 years old. A man came out to look at an unrelated project, and looked at the pipe and said that it looked uneven or broken in the middle, but not to worry about it and to just fix it when I had to fix it. When the water flow is heavy water does flow out of the other end of the pipe.
I was wondering if there was some sort of sealing technique that was available, rather than digging up the driveway and replacing the pipe.
Thanks,
itchy
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jloomis wrote the following:

Keep in mind that this is a drain pipe for rain runoff. It is fed by a ditch after a rain. It is not a potable water supply pipe for the house, nor a drain pipe for sewage. The OP says that it is working as it should at the present time. Why are we worrying that there could be a crack in it buried under the earth? The drain pipe might even be perforated to allow water to seep into the ground along its route. I now that the drain pipes I have for the gutter down spouts to move the rain water away from the house are perforated along their entire length and are buried under the ground.

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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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You are correct! Some pipes are the "leaching type" Since we do not know the actual problem we can only surmise. What looks like uneven or broken could well be a split pipe or like you say a leaching type pipe system. I just know that with new advances, companies now pull all types of pipes through existing collapsed piping which save the trenching aspect. So, sewage, water, drainage, electrical, phone, tv, etc. are possible candidates for this type of work to be done. It is not a big deal and does save lots of time. john
"willshak" wrote in message

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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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It's under a driveway so it's more of a concern. The size and location of the crack are important, but if and when it does fail, it won't be at a good time. Under a delivery truck, during a storm, etc.
As always, getting some trained eyeballs on the problem is the best bet. If the guy that alerted the OP to the problem has a set of trained eyeballs, you've got something to go on.
R
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Rico dJour wrote the following:

If it is running parallel to, and under the driveway at the street, it could belongs to the municipality. They may own a certain distance of the property from the street, usually 4 to 6 feet, or perhaps more. That's so they can dig up the property there to install pipes, conduits, sidewalks, curbs, or other construction without notifying or asking permission of the property owner. The only thing the owner can permanently install on that part of the property is a mailbox post, and the municipality can remove it when they need to without needing permission. It may be their problem, not the OPs. If the OP's property stakes at that street end are visible, he can deduct what part of his land belongs to the municipality. He should call them. They wouldn't want water to run onto the street and possibly freeze in the winter making driving dangerous.
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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[...]
Thanks for the input guys, I will have this double checked with some contractors that are more attuned to this type of problem. The person who gave me the original alert was a city employee who dealt with creek erosion problems.

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Itchy,
Take a look at the following link. I don't know if they can reline a pipe 12" in diameter or not, but it couldn't hurt to ask them.
http://www.maxlinerusa.com /
Luckily, I've never had a need for this product. However, should one arise, I'd give it some consideration and compare its cost to that of digging up my yard. I have no clue as to cost etc. and will cross that bridge when needed. As always, I have no affiliation with this company and so on. I just like the concept behind the product.
Hope this helps.
Peter.
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