basement condensation

I'm finishing my basement and was installing a new cable for cable t.v.. While cutting through the wall I noticed condesation on the back side (towards the block) of my insulation. I'm wondering if I have a potential problem or if this condensation will eventually evaporate. I sealed the concrete block walls with Drylock and built a 2 x 4 wall with insulation batts between the studs. I left a 1 1/2" - 2" air space between the back side of the stud wall and block wall to allow for air circulation. With it being December and the weather cold (20 degrees) I'm wondering if this is normal condensation that will be gone once the weather gets warmer.
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Heat and Cold produce condensation. Conditioned space ie. interior of basement is warm and exterior space ie. block wall face is cold thus moisture. I am wondering if a person could, without problem, vent the space between the insulated wall and the block. I realize this is impractical by venting into the room since the room is insulated. Could vents be made to allow the moist warm air trapped between the wall and the block to escape out? Dyylock is doing its job and so is the insulation..... I actually think this is a common problem on many southern facing insulated walls in homes and or garages. If you look at many of these exterior painted walls you can see stud outlines and spacing highlighted by a darker color in the paint or exterior coating(mold or fungus). I think the moisture gets trapped and drips down the wall and creates an enviornment for this to happen. We should just live in TP's jloomis

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No condensation is "normal". It's not a good thing and should always be avoided. But whether the condensation you describe is a fatal error or whether it minor enough that it will dissipate I can't say. I'd monitor it and see what happens when the weather warms up.
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You better rip that insulation off and do the job right as you risk a breeding ground for dangerous molds that can and do kill people.
You should have had a layer of polyethylene on top of the concrete block to form an impervious barrier before the insulation was applied to the surface.
You leave the condition at your own risk. Furthermore, the states are getting serious about laws that had to be created because there were and are guys like you that are a.) cheap and wanted to save alousy twenty bucks on a roll of poly , b.) ignorant and didn't know better or c.) assholes who will leave the job unfinished anyway as-is and try to pass it off to a buyer.
If you are the latter I do hope you get the stick shoved up your ass by the home inspectors when you get caught trying to pass this on to a buyer as this condition does get worse and it does get people ill and it can and has and will result in death. Condensation in between insulation is a breeding ground for mold and mold is nothing to fuck around with.

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to
surface.
It's not clear which way the damp is going but as well as tanking the basement there should be a vapour barrier on the inside. In the UL it would most likely be on the warm side of the insulation. It's to stops warm damp air from the house going through the plasterboard/drywall, through gaps in the insulation and condensing on the cold surfaces.
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You may want to take a look at these write ups.
http://www.buildingscience.com/search?SearchableText sement
Mike
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