Tip for cleaning car windshield

I know this looks dumb, and it's technically not a home cleaning question, but if you'll allow me the stretch, what's the best cleaning solution to use for removing the chemical fog that clings to the inside of a car windshield?
It's my understanding that sunlight causes chemical gases to emit from your dashboard, and those gases bind with dirt and other stuff and cling to the windshield. Typical cleaning solutions such as Windew don't do the job even when healthy amounts of vinegar are added.
Any tips?
-Al
P.S. I've also heard not to use Armor-All as a dashboard cleaner/preserver, as it actually worsens the above chemical "fog" problem.
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wrote:

My car is over 20 year old and the windshield cleans up easily with Windex. I spray the Windex on a paper towel first, then wipe the window. If the paper towel shows dirt, repeat the procedure. I use ArmourAll on the dashboard. My car is a smoke-free vehicle and there is no plastic window tint on the inside. It may be something local to your area. Do other vehicles in your neighborhood have the same fogging issue? Is there a film coating on the upholstery or ceiling? Brake dust can be difficult to remove.
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From what I've heard, the windshield film is caused by sunlight hitting the dashboard and releasing Polyvinyl Chlorides (PVCs) or Polyvinyl Alcohol (the stuff that's in Armor All?).
Under that theory, regular Armor All adds to the problem, as it contrbutes to PVCS. If you don't have this problem, perhaps you don't have a vinyl dash, don't park in the sun much, or are just lucky!
Armor All may now make some non-PVC solution, but I'm not aware of it.
I've seen suggestions to clean the windshield with a small amount of brake fluid, but would prefer using something else. Any ideas?
-Al
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I haven't had much trouble cleaning the film from the inside of my windshield, but a recurring spotty film on the outside was very tenacious. It was evident when I ran the wipers.
An expensive abrasive product called Nu-Glass worked, with a lot of rubbing. Bon Ami did the job cheaper. Then I discovered that a very old and inexpensive system did the job faster.
You mix four parts water with one part ammonia and half a part vinegar. Get the glass ready by whatever cleaning method you choose. Some sort of filmy soil will probably remain.
Apply a few drops of the mixture to the glass or a wad of newsprint and use the newsprint to polish the glass until dry. The paper will grab the film, leaving the glass crystal clear.
I use it for car glass, mirrors, and house windows.
--
Best Regards,
Lloyd

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The Car Guys just addressed this question (the film, not the cleaning). It *is* often "outgassing" from interior plastics, more noticable with new cars. This reference has more on the cause, but not a cleaning procedure:
http://tinyurl.com/uapu
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Hi Al
Two heavy smokers use my car, which is parked out in the hot sun all day long every day in an industrial area. Needless to say, the inside of the windshield is always gray, and if you try to drive into the sun, forget it, time to clean again.
I usually wipe down the windshield with alcohol first to cut the cigarette smoke, then use 'commercial grade' Windex, the grocery store stuff is too dilute to clean anything.
After you get it clean, if you can get your hands on some acidified isopropynol rub it in real good and buff it down. Then after that, all the grime comes off in one easy swipe. Acidified isopropynol is an exterior window water repellent used primarily on aircraft. They sell something similar for automobile use, I think under the trade name Rain-X, but it causes wiper blades to chatter and is not really great for low speed travel. But for making a film that grime comes off of easily, it can't be beat.
TTUL Gary
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snipped-for-privacy@bbs.galilei.com.nospam (Gary V. Deutschmann, Sr.) wrote:

What do they use it for? Parking? Have you reported these heavy smokers to the Mormon Church? Weight Watchers?

Marcey might get on your case in case regular Windex is a commercial sponsor.
What is 'commercial grade' Windex? Is it what they use for the bird commercials? Do they sell it? Under what name? Could I make some by boiling down regular Windex?

It's rubbing alcohol with a little hydrochloric acid. They use it in biology labs to extract material from cells.

Library of Medicine knows better. It's 84% ethanol, 4% isopropanol, and 1% ethyl sulfate. The other 9% is silicon oil (polydimethylsiloxanes) and siloxanes.
--
Best Regards,
Lloyd

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Hi Lloyd
We use a commercial grade of Windex, it just says Windex on the bottle and a blow-out that says 'institutional size'.
It is really great stuff. You don't realize how great until you run out and buy some at the grocery store and it don't work very well for what we were using it for when I first discovered it. At the time, I was working in an electronics repair shop and it worked miracles where everything else was failing. But even the commercial grade stuff is getting more and more diluted. Just like almost everything else you buy these days.
I wasn't sure what was in Rain-X as I have never bought it. I had easy access to the stuff airlines was using and knew it worked a whole lot better, and without wiper chatter if used on the outside.
We used to use newspaper when their was oil in the ink. Now all we end up with is black smudges on everything when we use it, so it was abandoned. In its stead we have been using some silicone impregnated sheeting for some glass items that look great when polished. Like glass case tops etc. But those sheets just cost to much for everyday use.
Your always up on things! I had a bottle of alcohol with an oil base some years back. The label had come off long before it was empty and I don't remember what the name of it was. It worked great for cleaning leather, especially of cigarette residue, without removing the color or leaving gray streaks. The bottle is now empty and I've looked through every file I have for the old label, which I retained somewhere so I could get some more. I also cannot find my list of various oils. Some oils dry, like 3 in 1, and some remain supple without going ransid. I've been siding with Olive Oil for the time being, until I can find my list again.
TTUL Gary
PS - My Bishop knows I smoke like a stoker furnace!
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Al Cunniff wrote:

If they still make something called GlassWax, that's the perfect thing for the job. Works like automotive paste wax.
--
I know God will not give me anything I can't handle.
I just wish that He didn't trust me so much. - Mother Teresa
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http://www.sciplus.com/singleItem.cfm?terms 18&cartLogFrom=Search
Expensive, but it works!
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