Removing engine oil stains from clothing

I did my first ever engine oil change for myself last week but spilled some on my sweater and pants that would not go away with normal washing. How do people clean it?
Thank you in advance,
--
Donglok Kim

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On Tue, 11 Jan 2005 20:18:59 +0000 (UTC), Canna Service User

Swarfega rubbed in well then a wash
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Dry cleaning should get clean engine oil out without any further treatment. The problem with detergents is that you may damage the colour or the fibres, especially if you have to rub the area. Another solution may be a cycle chain cleaner which works by simply spraying on and then washing off (no scrubbing required).
Hope this helps
--
DrClean
www.DrClean.co.uk
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On Tue, 11 Jan 2005 20:18:59 +0000 (UTC), Canna Service User

Mix liquid dishwashing detergent and Clorox II to form a paste and apply to the stain for 30 minutes. Carbon tetrachloride (dry cleaning fluid) will also work. Have a spare set of old clothes for car work.
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Didn't the Carbon tet go out years ago ? Dry cleaning fluid had been calld perk , short for perkcloroelethlean (the spelling is way off but I don't feel like looking it up).
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Dry cleaning fluid is normally perchloroethylene but can be now white spirit or liquid carbondioxide. Petrol will also degenerate oil. With all of these you will have to let the solvent evaporate to get rid of it, if you wash something with a solvent on it will turn into an emulsion and spread over the whole garment - very difficult to remove sometimes.
Hope this helps
--
DrClean
www.DrClean.co.uk
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best is spray oven cleaner
not on silk/wool
lave it on for about 10 minutes
rinse and wash normally
i believe carbon tetrachloride is now abanned item i forget chemistry of new dry cleaning chemicals
i do know incidently that new dry cleaning chemical is carbon dioxide
hth pete r
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ilaboo wrote:

You mean concentrated lye? Miners' wives used to use it on coal stains.
I wonder what kinds of fiber would be happy with lye. It's murder on nylon and can change the color of some dyes.
In the 1600s, "household lye" was a mixture of wood ashes and urine. You'd hang your linen in a tub, pour the mixture over it, collect it, and repeat until the cloth was clean. If the linen was especially dirty you could add washing soda to the mixture.
Sincerely, Choreboy
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no the spray oven cleaner is about 4$ to 6% sodium hydroxide
hth peter
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