paint

is there a special method to painting a ceiling? I have painted the bathroom with latex enamel since it is a bathroom & see numerous brush strokes.
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oh dear - you should always use a roller for large areas :-)
go round the edges with a brush first, as usual (you'll want 2 coats unless it's the same colour) & then just use a roller for the rest (again, 2 coats unless it's the same colour - or, of course, if it's one-coat ceiling paint, one coat should do, funnily enough). be aware that rollers spatter slightly - in the case of painting ceilings, you can spatter the walls by accident much more easily than you might think, as well as the floor (so keep the floor properly covered). keep a damp cloth handy & just wipe it off the walls immediately if that happens (assuming water-based paint, of course). in the case of doing a ceiling _and_ walls, just do the ceiling first & the wall spatters are not an issue - you paint over them when doing the walls.
besides the issue of spattering the walls, painting a ceiling is just the same as a wall, the method is identical. it's just more physically demanding & uncomfortable, that's all. same method, preparation, etc.
make sure not to overload the roller, because besides wanting to minimise spatter, the coats should be thin and even. kylie
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0tterbot wrote:

I always use a brush. I detest rollers. I don't have 'the knack' My SIL uses nothing BUT a roller, he detests brushes. I tell him that I know of no professional painter that uses a roller, not here anyway and he still refuses to budge. He can paint a room in an hour but my daughter does the edges - the harder part. I take all day but I do a far better job with no mess and I use one brush for edges and middle so less cleaning. Maybe the OP is using the wrong paint and the wrong brush, possibly a cheap brush? The easiest of the lot was a spray painting kit. I don't see it nowadays but recall a painter at my works doing the walls with eggshell. It was a work of art completed in minutes with no effort, no mess and extremely accurate. He allowed me to do a bit for him it was a piece of cake. I wonder why that method has not become popular.
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Mrs Bonk wrote:

Tell us about your sister-in-law's surgery!

You could work faster with a string mop.

Use a good brush, get it soft by cutting in, use a paint with good leveling, brush it on in one direction, then go over it at right angles.

Too many rules.
1.Hold the gun perpendicular to the target surface; that is, square to the surface. 2.Always keep the gun at an equal distance to the surface. 3.Move the gun either across or up and down the surface at a steady rate. 4.Move the gun at a consistant speed to conserve material and provide even coverage. 5.The correct spraying speed allows a full wet coat of paint to be applied without runs or sags. 6.The gun should be moved in a confident and flowing fashion without hesitation. 7.If you lack experience, practice moving the gun over the surface before you actually begin to paint. 8.Spray alternately from right to left and left to right. 9.Begin movement of the gun (about six inches) before you press the trigger. 10.Release trigger before movement of the gun ceases. This prevents sharp cut-off in the spray pattern. 11.Holding the gun closer to the surface deposits more paint on the surface and produces a norrower spray pattern. 12.Holding the gun farther from the surface produces a thinner coat and a wider spray pattern. 13.If runs, sags or excessive paint occur change to a spray tip with a smaller orifice. 14.If the coverage looks too thin or you wish to spray faster change to a tip with a larger orifice. 15.Proper overlapping of the spray pattern is essential for even finish. 16.It is advisable to apply at least two coats so don't try and get it perfect first time round. 17.Be sure to overlap each stroke. 18.When spraying horizontally, aim at the bottom edge of the preceding stroke so as to overlap the previous stroke by 50%. 19.On a corner or edge split the center of the spray pattern and spray vertically so that adjoining sections receive even amounts of paint. 20.Avoid holding the gun at an angle, as this deposits paint unevenly. 21.DO NOT swing the gun in an arc like movement as this results in an uneven finish. 22.On exteriors, if conditions are windy angle the spray pattern into the wind to avoid drifting. 23.Work from ground to roof. 24.Do not attempt to spray if the wind is excessive. 25.Whenspraying with a shield hold it firmly against the surface. 26.Angle the gun slightly away from the shield and towards the target surface. This will prevent paint from being forced underneath the shield. 27.Shrubs next to houses should be tied back and covered with sheets. The sheets should removed as soon as possible. 28.A Gun Extension can be used to reach awkward areas. 29.Nearby vehicles should be moved or covered whenever in the vicinity of a spray job. 30.Always be careful of any surrounding objects which may be damaged by overspray. *** Free account sponsored by SecureIX.com *** *** Encrypt your Internet usage with a free VPN account from http://www.SecureIX.com ***
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Sawney Beane wrote:

You will find a picture of him in your inbox Mr Beane. He is on stage and dressed for the part.

But would it be as good a job?

a little. I say "pooey" - one could write a list of similar rules for a paintbrush . I imagine the equipment could easily be computerised if not done so already to take into account distance and trigger pressure etc. and thereby give nice even coverage. I am sure if i could master it in one minute and an experienced user would have a field day doing a ceiling.
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