OT? CO detector


Dear friends, This is off topic but I am not sure where to post my question to. Maybe someone here can help. I have a problem with my new carbon monoxide detector. It goes off whenever I cook chilli or curry and today it went off when I was cooking egg and chips. I really don't know why. Could it be faulty? TIA
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wrote:

Borrow or buy another detector to put along side, then run a test.
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Phisherman wrote:

What a good idea! Well done Phish. I have no idea who I can borrow one from... so I could buy one. I was hoping someone in the group would have the same problem, or have heard of the same thing to save me the expense. The damn thing had a fit today when I cooked sausages in onion/mushroom and red wine sauce. I have switched it off now, can't be bothered with it beep, beep, beeping. I will cross post this to my friends in cooking chat in case anyone there has had my problem and can find time to answer.
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Mrs Bonk wrote:

I has an indicating CO detector, and although it didn't show alarming levels (both meanings intended), it did rise from zero when the oven was in use. If yours is a combination CO and fire detector, smoke might set it off. There's no need for one near the kitchen range. You need protection from furnace leaks and high levels in the sleeping areas.
Jerry
--
Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get.

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Jerry Avins wrote:

Mine is solely CO detection and is not in my kitchen. It is plugged into a point near the floor in the dining room, next door, so to speak, although there is no door as I removed it to make more space and to open out the downstairs a little. Thing is Jerry, that there is a french door near it and when I cook I often get condensation on the glass of the door, sometimes it is quite fogged up so I guess cooking fumes, despite my hood ( not an extractor to outside) make their way to the dining room as if drawn that way by the glass. I I have warm air heating and the furnace is in the kitchen. I may now plug my CO detector in upstairs, at least I should be safe then when asleep.
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Mrs Bonk wrote:

You can check it by continuing what you're doing for eight hours. If there's no nausea and it takes more than two hours to get a headache, don't worry about it.
Consider buying an old CO detector to augment the new one. Statistics prove old carbon monoxide is twice as deadly.
Consider buying a gas stove. Carbon monoxide is lighter than air, so if you install the stove on a high platform, the open flame will burn away any carbon monoxide your weird recipes produce.
Do you like to warm your car up while you cook? What room do you keep it in?
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E Z Peaces wrote:

Weird recipes? What nonsense. Have you been spying on me in cooking chat?

It is outside you ninny. These days, one does not "warm up" a car. You must have a real old banger to think otherwise. Do you still have a starting handle? I *could* tell you what to do with it.
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