Banning Cars from Manhattan (Paul Goodman)

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Followups set.
Robert Cote wrote:

Is that based on a survey of expectations or on actual commute times? A survey isn't of much use; everyone wants a shorter commute. From what I've seen of actual commute times, transit users accept much longer commute times than POV commuters.
Even so, the data I've seen isn't of much use but it does point us in the right direction. A better comparison would be actual commute times for transit and POV users broken down by income level and possibly urban area. I haven't been able to find such data.
Mark
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I think there is a variety that's smaller, developed specifically for small gardens. That would be worth looking into.
A garage top could also be turned into a good habitat for birds and so on. Planted right, it could also be very private. On the periphery, one could use dwarf varieties of flowering shrubs, small/miniature trees (some varieties only go to 5' or so), tall clumping (not running!) ornamental grasses. If you go for things that are scented, that's an added dimension which poeple (and from what I've seen, most landscapers) overlook.
There are resin planters that look very much like concrete or ceramic (etc.) ones, which offers the possibility of even more diversity - you can grow vegetables in those, for example, even miniature fruit trees.
A small garden area is challenging but IMO loads of fun to plan. You couod arrange for privacy, plus an area for sunbathing, plus some veggies and some fruit, and so on and so forth.
Sounds like fun!
- K.
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Yup :) !
The miracle of grafting. I can't recall, tho', whether the grafts have to be all citrus-relatives (i.e., orange, lemon, lime), all plum-relatives (plum, apricot, peach), all apple-relatives, etc., or whether you can mix citrus with plum with apple.
You can also get miniature pomegranat, but I don't know whether pomegranat has ever been co-grafted with any other fruits.
Geez I love plants, and picturing how the different ones would look in various locations/proximities, how they grow and change, and everything. ((It appalls me to see some of the things done by so-called "landscapers" - some are OK but so many are just awful, no sense at all for color balance, climate appropriateness, blooming or color periods, or even the simplest basics of soil amendment - you wouldn't beleive how many times I go thorugh what poeple think of as "a pretty neighborhood" and see what I think of as mistake after mistake after mistake =>:-p ))
Anyhoo, grafting is not evtremely mysterious, the info is in any landscaping/gardening/landscape-design book worth its salt. OTOH grafts are readily available, too. I think (if I remeber correctly) that most roses, at least most cold-hardy ones, are grafts. I'd have to read up on it all again tho'. ((As tho' that'd be such torture for me <L!>))
So the multi-fruit trees, going back to the topic, are grafts. I've forgotten what the rootstock is (that's why we have books tho' :) ). If I knew I was going to stay in a warm climate, I'd like some patio containers with Citrus. There was something I got to try while in California, it was a lemon but the interior was green like a lime, and the fruit could be eaten off the rind, because it was less acidic than a common lemon. Unfortunately, I've forgotten the name :( .
Citrus also attracts butterflies and, if I remember correctly, hummingbirds. Plus the scent is wonderful. Even the ripening fruit smells really good.
So for a warm climate, I'd definitely recommend citrus, and for a small garden, your suggestion also, miniature citrus including multi-fruit graft types.
Honeysuckle - at least, the old wild kind, not the recent cultivars - are fun in that they smell great plus, if you pick the flower at the base, pinch off the bottom, and pull out the ?anther? (I think that's the long thing), a big thick drop of nectar comes out that is slight spicy as well as sweet. That's fun for the kids (and adults when nobody is watching <g>). The problem is that it is sometimes considered "invasive" because the vines grow so large. OTOH it's one way to add privacy during the growing season - grow it on a trellis or fence. It takes a lot of trimming, if one wishes to do that.
Uh-oh, I'd better not get started on plants tho'. I'll be here for three days without moving <LOL!>
- K.
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www.fruitsaladtrees.com says
------------------------------------------------------ There are 4 Tree Types
1.. Stonefruit which grows peaches, plums, nectarines, apricots, peachcots 2.. Citrus which grows oranges, mandarins, lemons, limes, grapefruits, tangellos, pomellos, 3.. Multi apples only 4.. Multi nashi fruit only ------------------------------------------------------
See also http://www.ananova.com/news/story/sm_1478831.html?menu=news.quirkies

I know that there is graft in the rose industry. Clueless as to where it has spread it's tendrils.

Sprite.
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Ah, OK - it would make sense to try to keep the fruits in the same family, so that one doesn't have to try to accomidate needs that might be conflicting.
Oh yeah, one also has to be sure to not confuse "miniature fruit trees" with "trees that bear miniature fruit".

OK.....that's strange enough...

HAH! That's funny ;)

Woof! But those things *were* good.
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AH, the Pomegranate. Related to the rose, the pomegranate produces a fruit that is very similar to a "mega-rose-hip", consisting of a red-skinned cellulose (some describe it as "fleshy" but it reminds me more of dense styrofoam) holding a large number of seeds in a pip-like body, apx. 5/8" long and 3-4/8" cross-sectional diameter. The pip is filled with juice, and is the part that's eaten. The seeds are also edible, and some cuisines, such as Indian, use the seeds (usually finely ground) in cooking as a flavoring and (if I recall correctly) as a lihgt thickener (not sure of the latter, tho').
The juice has a tart sweetness that's most similar to cranberry.
To eat a pomegranate, note where the sections are - there are, I think, five, that bulge out somewhat longitudinally. Open the fruit by avoiding those, and slicing (to a depth of about 1/2 to 3/4 of an inch) down the center of the flattest areas, from the top of the pomegranate to the bottom.
**NOTE**!!! Absolutely *DO NOT* eat a pomegranate over anything you don't want stained red - the color is just about impossible to get out (if three is something that does get it out, I've yet to hear of it). Use a thick (pref. at least doubled) towel, ot other highly absorbant cloth or similar.
Anyhoo, once you've split the pomegranate, prise it apart very carefully (because the seeds tend to pop out if the fruit is adequately ripe). Gently tease the pips/seeds away from the capsule.
You can squeeze off the juice and spit out the seed, or eat the whole thing (the seeds are high in fiber - NOTE! - if you have diverticulitis, talk to your gastroenterologist before eating a pomegranate, because I don't know whether the seeds are good to eat if you have diverticulitis). Some pople eat one pip/seed at a time, others tease off a large number of the things for a big flavor burst.
If you like the flavor of pomegranate but hate the mess, you can buy the Pom brand pure pomegranate juice (just be careful to read the label and make sure it's not a blend; you don;t pay much less when the pomegranate juice is adulterated with other fruit juices - same goes for cranberry juice - go for the straight-up real thing, not these stupid "coctails" that are more non-nutritive sugar-water than juice - if you want to sweeten it a bit, you can do so to your taste - it's also good mixed with Diet Tonic Water - Safeway Select is good, more Quinine taste if you like that).
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[snipped - lessons in pomegranate etiquette or lack thereof]

Oh yeah. Sinks are great. Best reason to have a kitchen island - make it One Big Sink. Good for eating barbeque, ripe fruit, and all sorts of other highly enjoyable food :) Oy, now I'm getting hungry...
My invention: big sink the includes a bin you can take out and put ice into, and set another bin (all stainless steel) that holds your beer. OK, maybe a central non-sink strip to hold rectangular servers with roased-in-the-husk corn, condiments, and the like.
Have a few of those in the island, seating on both sides. Tile floor with drainage to allow wet bathing suits to drain. Big ol' windows for lots of light. No need for napkins, just wash your hands and face as you go. HAve a teevee in view and show some DVDs ((in my case, prob. old "B" scifi moviesand such))
Similar in idea/philosophy to the Cajun Boil thing, where the crawdads and whatnot get placed (OK, dumped ;) !) onto a newspaper-covered picnic table and everyone just digs in and has a lot of laughs.
Maybe I'm a just a slob but that would be *my* idea of entertaining. Fine china and crystal, pbfllt! If people aren't there for the company and the food, they can leave, thank you.
I've never seen a kitchen set up like that.
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*Good Point!!*
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One of the most beautiful fruits.
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Esp. a ripe one, the deep hues of reds, scarlets, and so on. The seeds look like their namesake - clear garnets. (Pomegranate = "apple of garnets" or something like that, sort of like pomme du terre, potato, translates as "earth apple")
Have to get ripe ones, otherwise the juice is sour and the seeds are really hard. Ripe ones should be slightly fragrant (assuming one has a decent sense of smell). Any ripe fruit should be lightly fragrant. Veggies too, actually.
Another aspect of setting up a garden to include fragrance - not only the flowers, but also the fruits and the leaves.
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couod
I've a book called, iirc, "Square Foot Gardening" that looks like it might be good.
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I think I'd seen that one but didn't buy it. Mostly because I have a number of landscaping books (hey, everyone needs a hobby - or ten or twenty...) and it might have repeated info in those. Nowadays i tend to concentrate on "local" books. For example, before moving here, I bought a few books that deal specifically with native and exotic plants, as well as various soil, pest, and other garden issues, specific to Houston and the Gulf Coast area.
((Which is what makes me so crazy with some of the "landscapers" whose work I've come across - the guy who was hired by the management company for this place, for one, didn't even amend the soil or create raised beds - just shoved a few azaleas and otehr thirsty, and not-very-heat-tolerant, plants into the ground, and then kvetched when they shrivelled up and died. He was telling me to water them - but water is not the issue, it's that the wrong plants were put into the wrong places and put into the ground in the completely wrong way.))
None of which, let me add, is intended as a denigration for any of the small-scale-gardening books! They offer some excellent ideas, including ideas for container and/or "vertical" gardening, that help one get the most out of one's space - the most use, the most beauty, the most economy, and so on.
It's just that the info has to be built-upon.
Best to stop myself right there... ;)
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and
This is correct ONLY for heavy freight loads. It has long been established that for passengers rail is about the same as your private car. For transit buses, private cars are more efficient. If you want to save fuel, moving truck traffic to railroads is a good idea. Moving passengers is a waste of time as far as fuel is concerned. ALSO, moving passengers by rail is very, very expensive, about 4 times more expensive than moving them by air.
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I've read river barges have the least kWh kWh/ton-mile.

Are we talking about moving 20 100-pound people 1 mile?

I doubt that.

I wonder why. It seems useful to separate monty and energy here, eg union crews at every state boundary and policies that allow near-empty trains, vs mostly-full Boswash trains.
Nick
Tired of Iraq? Do something about it. Learn to halve your energy use while having fun with math and science.
Join PE Drew Gillett and PhD Rich Komp and me for a workshop on Solar House Heating and Natural Cooling Strategies at the first Pennsylvania Renewable Energy Festival on Saturday September 24, 2005 near Allentown. See
http://www.paenergyfest.com/workshop-info.shtml
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"tired" of Iraq? War policy should be decided on whether or not it's generating good teevee?
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wrote:

transportation.
car.
passengers
Your ignorance is great but your seem to live your opinions. Try FActs.

All irrelevant. Rail travel for people is expensive. BoshWash must get 40 cents per mile to break even. It is the only place Amtrak comes close to getting that kind of income.

Then you would have to go to long distance buses, which use HALF the energy Amtrak does.

House
Unlike you, I already have a solar roof for hot water, and have for 28 years since the last 'crisis.' I have a high-efficiency heat pump and can heat with wood too.
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Well?
In rhetoric, an assertion demands no more than a counterassertion.

Perhaps, but the subject was energy.

http://www.paenergyfest.com/workshop-info.shtml

Pray tell us more.
Nick
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wrote:>>ALSO, moving passengers by rail is very, very expensive, about 4 times

No doubt it is too expensive, mostly because passenger trains must run on schedule and can't be "humped" as freight trains are, and IMHO, unions strangle common sense management.
Once when I was dispatching for a general commodities trucking firm, we got a call from a major railroad company out of Minneapolis who needed a machine hauled from Louisville, KY. They were willing to pay the full 40,000 lb. rate for a 500 lb part. I asked why they didn't ship it in by rail and the answer was, "We can't wait that long, we have to have it here within the next two weeks." That tells me, they have a problem with time schedules.
When they did haul passengers, the fare was subsidized by also hauling the mail. U. S. Post office contracts required regularly scheduled runs with lots of stops... why not carry a few passengers at the same time? But when trucks began delivering the mail (they could handle even more stops because they used the highway system) passenger fares would have been prohibitive, even at a serviceman's discount of 50% when riding in uniform. Other than acts of terror and war, that was the saddest event in my lifetime.
In 1962, the train ride from San Diego to Chicago took nearly a week but was it beautiful beyond description. However, my favorite run was from Chicago to Woodruff, WI (I think it ended in Hurley or Superior but never rode it that far) on the Chicago-Northwestern. It took 12 hours to go approx. three hundred miles, stopping at every single little town for 5 to 15 minutes to drop off and pick up mail. On snowy nights or bright summer days, I met a lot of friendly people along the way and arrived refreshed and ready for leave. God, how I miss those days. I have never found a more enjoyable way to get from point A to point B. Probably never will, either.
Sorry to be so long winded.
El (an old vet if you can't tell by this post.)
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