Ye olde wiring reg's



Did this rely on "night soil" collection?
If so a thunderbox seems a rational alternative to European cess pit inspections.
HN
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On Sun, 03 Jun 2012 20:20:30 +0100, djc wrote:

The upstairs of our house (1948-ish) here in the US is like that, just a single socket in each bedroom (and no earth/ground) - drives the kids nuts what with all their various gadgets that need to be plugged in :-)
It's all radial over here; we've got a big breaker panel feeding most of the house, then an older fusebox (2x big cartridge fuses and 4x screw-in fuses) for the office. There are other similar fuseboxes in the garage, workshop and barn (although the barn no longer has power; previously that was done by an overhead run from the house attic). Wiring is a mixture of new PVC stuff and older cloth-covered rubber (with evidence that the workshop once served as a small house and had knob-and-tube)
cheers
Jules
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On Jun 4, 3:34 pm, Jules Richardson

luxury, sockets in bedrooms.

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NT wrote:

HeHe - I've got 8-10 socket outlets in each bedroom (arranged as doubles) and they are all full - I have 2 multiways for computers and Internet/Wifi/printer.
--
Tim Watts

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John Rumm wrote:

When I bought this house it had one single socket per room. And if I put the immersion on at the same time as the kettle the 15A fuse used to blow.
--
Adam



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On 04/06/2012 15:22, ARWadsworth wrote:

Just the way dennis would wire it ;-)
--
Cheers,

John.

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John Rumm wrote:

The rewire had to wait until I had replaced the coal fired boiler. It took 4 of us to lift it outside and I thought the pikeys were going to get a hernia taking it up the garden steps.
--
Adam



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On Mon, 04 Jun 2012 10:11:20 -0700, harry wrote:

Yes, I can just see you wiring a house so that it had no electricity, somehow.
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On Mon, 4 Jun 2012 10:11:20 -0700 (PDT), harry wrote:

Some of the more remote places around here are still "off grid". This place probably got power around 1975 and mains water maybe 10 years later.
--
Cheers
Dave.




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wrote:

As an apprentice electrician I remember wiring a few houses with no electricity and gas lighting. Even some (mostly farms) where they only had paraffin lamps. We had a neighbour to our last house who finally got electricity in 1992 (farm again.)
Of course, during the war, power sockets were illegal (at least in London) so anything like an electic iron had to be plugged into the lights. Explains why wiring was so primitive.
rusty.
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On Tue, 5 Jun 2012 07:20:06 +0100, "John"

Have you got a refrence for that, it raises a number of questions.
I did find this http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/stamp/stamp.jsp?arnumber 295108 havn't had time to read through it,but I noticed this bit:
"The saving of the rarer metals may become more important than the risk of breakdown, than the risk of shock and fire, and than the heavy costs of recurring maintenance. There is already an increasing tendency in this direction, and the day may come when conditions will force the adoption of installations of bare iron conductors, air insulation and a protective covering of some plaster-like material"
Strange grammer with the three than's, but the meaning is clear enough.
--
Graham.
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My parents bought their house in 1955 (or thereabouts), whilst it was still being built. Fortunately, it was PVC wiring, a ring circuit, and lighting circuit with CPC, MK accessories, and it's all still fine. Only the Wylex CU has had to be replaced, although when we last redid the kitchen 12 years ago, I put all new circuits into that, and of course, more sockets have been added elsewhere over time.
However, as originally designed, it was only one socket per room except the kitchen and living room had two. Parents had to pay for any optional extras, and bought an extra one in the living room, probably being rather strapped for cash at the time. All singles, of course.
In the 1960's, the Parker Morris standard for homes was created, and this specified things like minimum numbers of sockets, and it was quickly adopted, initially in council housing (eventually became mandatory anyway), but the public sector effectively had to follow too.
--
Andrew Gabriel
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