working on gas.

My gas supplier has turned the gas off at the meter saying there's a a leak or the system needs tightening. Currently there's a 0.5 milli bar 'leak' in 2 mins. which he says is within limits but should be checked out by a gas safe engineer.
while in a 'discusion" with an 'expert in everything' :- when I said I don t; know anyone that's gas safe so I couldn;t do this as a DIY job, unless I became gas safe registared and I don't believe that would be an efficient use of my time or be profitable.
he has said in another post.

me > > I don;t know anyone that is gas safe,

He is a blitheriong idiot or have I got this wrong ?
can I really repair my own gas leak
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 24/10/2014 15:38, whisky-dave wrote:

AIUI, yes, you can work on gas but you must be competent, i.e. if it goes wrong you were not competent. If you get paid for the work you must be Gas Safe registered.
Peter
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, 24 October 2014 15:56:59 UTC+1, Peter Andrews wrote:

Correct. There are two requirements in the legislation: Firstly, *anyone* who works on gas must be "competent". "Competent" is not defined in the legislation, so it has it's usual English meaning of "capable of doing the work without serious errors". Note that pretty much any error with gas is serious ...
Secondly, if someone is *paid* to work on gas (the legislation goes a little wider than actual money changing hands), then the effect of the legislation is that they must be Gas Safe registered. (Actually the legislation allows the Secretary of state to define classes of people who may be paid to do work on gas. At the moment the only defined class is "Gas Safe Registered").
So the OP's correspondent is correct that you don't have to be registered on gas in your own home, but that doesn't necessarily mean the OP is permitted.
If I were the OP, I'd find a local plumber and pay the call-out charge.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 24/10/2014 15:56, Peter Andrews wrote:

That sounds like good advice. Leaks tend to get worse with time.

You can't be prevented from mending your own gas leak or as a bloke who lived a few miles from me installing your own gas CH system. However, when it explodes destroying your house don't expect the insurers to pay up. The house I recall was left as a blackened ruin for years after.
ISTR another case where a "Competent" person with the appropriate Gas Safe certificate failed to properly leak test the system and demolished three houses in a terraced row but at least the insurers did pay up.
--
Regards,
Martin Brown
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 27/10/14 12:15, Martin Brown wrote:

That must have made the papers - do you have a link?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 27/10/2014 13:19, Tim Watts wrote:

It did in 2009 but D&S seem to have broken their indexing. Only mention of it today is on Wiki and various clones of the same sentence.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ellerbeck
You could try the wayback machine.

--
Regards,
Martin Brown
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 24/10/2014 15:38, whisky-dave wrote:

there are really 3 questions here: –
1 are you capable of repairing your own gas leak and testing the system afterwards?
Generally speaking, judging by your username and various typos, plus the fact you are having to ask the question at all, the answer is probably no.
To test the system, you would need a manometer. I am guessing that you do not have one. So, you will not be able to test the system after you have worked on it. you can make a manometer, but I will leave you to work that one out.
2 Are you allowed to work on the pipework, now that the gas has been switched off?
Yes you are. however, on a practical basis, it is going to be very difficult to find any leak without the gas switched on. The usual way as to pressurise the pipework and spray soapy water on the joints. That will not work if there is no gas.
3 are you allowed to switch the gas back on again after you have worked on the pipework?
No. You really need to get your local gas safe engineer to come and switch it back on again and test the pressure drop.
All in all, if you want to stay legal, you may as well get your gas safe engineer to do the whole job.
If you do not care about being legal, then you may be able to get it sorted out yourself, but I strongly recommend getting somebody to do a further pressure drop test after you have finished. you may be astonished to find that there are not that many gas safe engineers queueing up to check over your work, though.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, 24 October 2014 15:58:17 UTC+1, GB wrote:

An interetsing question. After the gas safe engineer turned up and switched off teh gas and putting a notice on it saying such. I'm not sure if I can switch the gas back on and use it as I have for the last few years, with the leak I reported. ?

I don't see usernames as meaning very much. But if that is what you use to 'test' a person compendancey in anither I've think I've read enough.

Not that difficult.

That's what I thought.

Yep I know, I have a spray can leak detector I brought a couple of years ago. when I first thought I had a leak. http://www.rapidonline.com/Mechanical-Fastenings-Fixings/Draper-400ml-Leak-Detector-91-1583/?source=googleps&utm_source=googleps&IncVat=1&gclid=CPyM4cTjzMECFYzHtAodnl0A2A

That's what I was assuming, especaily now it has been turned off by a gas safe man and notice put on it.

Which is what I thought in the first place.

Well I did have a sip of beer on the undergound a few months back.

I assume they will if I pay them.
Do you have an advice on choosing a gas safe person ? I mean would someone called bestgasintheuk.aol.com be a good choice or perhaps British gas, we all know how great their service and business models are.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
whisky-dave wrote:

Was it a gas-safe registered engineer, or a Transco engineer?
What does the disconnection notice say on it? Is the notice on the meter or a particular appliance?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, 27 October 2014 12:00:41 UTC, Andy Burns wrote:

For a few years some people have said they can smell gas near the meter cup board which is at the top of my stairs. For the past few years the meter re aders have said they can't smell gas so it's OK, and I've said my meter is over 27 years old, but apprently that doesn't mater, even though my electri c one has been replaced 3 times. This year I decided NOT to use my gas fire from mid july and as a test I re corded all my meter readings (everyday) from about xmas 2013. From mid july to mid sept with No gas appliance used I measured a usage of 1 cu foot of gas. When the meter reader called (I purposfully didn't submit a reading)to read the meter in mid september he opened the cupboard and smelt gas, I thought at bloody last someone else can smell it. he phoned the emergncy no. and a bloke came out within ~30min. He found a leak in the pipe to the meter which he said was his resposibilit y. He found the leak using an electrical meter think it was 80ppm, he then use d the soap spray and found a leak in the pipework near the meter. He replaced the pipework and no further leak was detected with the elec. me ter.
He then used the manometer as a final check and said I still have a leak, he capped off teh meter and left a safety notice in the meter cupboard and said I'll have to get someone in to repair the leak. I didn't bother readin g the safety notice, as I wasn't prepared to uncap my supply as I thought t hat'd be illegal.
A friend recommended someone (gas safe)and I got them to come over. He found I had a 0.5mbar drop in pressure. I have a cooker outlet with a baynet connector that he disconnected in case it was that, but it could still be the pipework to that. he then went to check the fire, which he said was too old to service. So he said he'll have to switch off the valve issolating the fire so it cou ldn;t be used and for testing the pipework. ON trying it he said it could be 'generating' CO "see the orange flame", I thought orange, red, blue was OK and yellow was CO. My CO detector has never detected CO, it's an electricical one.

I'll check, there was a sticker which he never stuck and a noticed both of which are just loose laying in the gas meter cupboard. It was a large sticker and would have covered the meter.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 27/10/2014 16:30, whisky-dave wrote:

So did he do a drop test with the cooker unplugged and the fire isolated?
--
Cheers,

John.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, 27 October 2014 18:46:56 UTC, John Rumm wrote:

case it was that, but it could still be the pipework to that.

couldn;t be used and for testing the pipework.

I do not have a gas cooker, he removed the baynet vconnector and replaced i t with am 'end cap' is what I'd call it. He isolated the fire and found the 0.5mbar 'leak' still present.
The nationalgrid bloke left TWO safet triangles in the meter cupboard. text below white on red or yellow text,
Nationalgrid metering
WARNING The outlet connection to this meter contains a sealing disc THE REMOVAL OF THE SEALING DISC, CONNECTION, TESTING, PURGING AND COMMISSIO NING OF THE INSTALLATION PIPEWORK AND APPLIANCES *MUST* BE CARRIED OUT BY A GAS SAFE REGISTARED INSTALLER
---------------------------------------- SAFETY WARNING You are warned that this gas appliance/installation has been classified IMMEDIATELY DANGEROUS........
This appliance/installation is dangerous and has been disconnected for YOUR SAFETY. It must not be reconnected until a 'GAS SAFE' registared installer has carried out remedial work on the appliance/installation to render it s afe to use. It is an offence to continue using an unsafe appliance/installa tion: DO NOT REMOVE.
------------------------------ This is why I thought I wasn;t allowed to work on the gas suply in my home.
I also assume that even if I was gas safe trained (as another friend is) th at the person still needs to be registared as gas safe.
i.e a corgi 'engineer' without the new gas safe cert. would NOT be allowed to work on my gas but could on his own.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 28/10/2014 10:44, whisky-dave wrote:

They are trying to make the point that if you survive the explosion resulting from reconnecting the gas again without fixing the leak then they will very probably sue you. Your insurers won't pay out either.
Here are a couple that a "gas safe" fitter did earlier:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-11671916
http://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/news/greater-manchester-news/gas-fitter-walks-free-over-6357146
(actually a few in that neck of the woods)
--
Regards,
Martin Brown
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 28/10/14 11:09, Martin Brown wrote:

Didn't see a reference in there to the work being done by registered fitters, though the fact a Housing Trust had ordered the work, one would hope so!

"Suspended sentence"? What he did was not negligent - it was way worse - I don't even have a word for that.
"Negligent" is burning the cables with your blowlamp and not noticing.
Noticing that you've charred the cables the wrapping a bit of tape around then next to a copper gas pipe is pre-meditated AFAIAC.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 28/10/2014 11:33, Tim Watts wrote:

"An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found that Laffin, an employee at AWL Plumbing and Heating Ltd in Swinton , had damaged live electrical wires while installing the boiler.
Manchester Crown Court heard Laffin had burnt them while using a blow torch to solder together gas pipes that ran alongside them.
He wrapped plastic tape around the cables instead of repairing them, despite them being badly charred.
The investigation found one of the damaged cables had burnt through the tape and gradually burnt a hole in one of the gas pipes."
My jaw dropped. What a prat!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 28/10/2014 11:33, Tim Watts wrote:

I agree. It doesn't give you confidence in the "Gas Safe" certificate if what the second guy did fails to merit a custodial sentence.
--
Regards,
Martin Brown
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 28/10/2014 11:33, Tim Watts wrote:

Sometimes you get cases where building work in general causes a gas leak, but there was no actual gas work undertaken. Just disturbance of existing pipework or an appliance can be enough.
A friend of mine moved into a new house once, and after the first year there got the boiler serviced. During the service the fitter noticed that the gas pipe to it had never been soldered at a joint! However it was not leaking do to being a fairly tight joint and there being enough flux on it to keep it gas tight. The implication being that the original fitter many years previous was negligent, but by fluke there was not a bad outcome. You can easily imagine were even decorating near the pipe could have moved it enough to start a leak though.

Indeed - although that storey as a whole does sound a bit suspect to me.
What kind of electrical fault in a cable can you imagine generating enough spot heat in a copper cable to melt a hole in a copper pipe, but not tripping a protective device, or rendering the circuit inoperative, or making lots of smoke etc?
I could just about understand if he created a hard short on a cable strapped against a pipe, it could flash over enough at the time to damage the pipe - but that would have left it leaking at the time.
--
Cheers,

John.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 28/10/14 16:45, John Rumm wrote:

I guess.
That's why I "walk" my new pipes and check I did each joint - easy to miss one otherwise.

It would be interesting to see the court transcripts there...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yeah, I bet the real story has been utterly mangled by the time it ended up in the media.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not if you are too stupid to work out that it may go bang.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.