Wiki: roofing materials

Some quotes & comments for feedback on a new wiki article... I think it nee ds some work. What do you reckon?
NT
Roofing materials
===Clay Tile=Clay is what has been used for many years to create the traditional roof ti
le look that we have become so accustomed to throughout the residential str eets of the UK. It's the most popular roofing solutions that can be seen ac ross almost every roofscape in cities, towns and villages.
not true
The most popular colour of these tiles is the traditional red, which appea rs to be a shade of brown/orange. These are designed to be interlocking, me aning that they are placed in a row one overlapping the next, with the next row placed on top until they are sealed at the top, which is known as the ridgeline with specially designed ridge tiles. This allows water to simply flow over one onto the next without the worry of moisture getting in.
===Thatch=This attractive alternative to solid roofing has become a symbol of country side cottages not only in the UK but throughout many other countries as wel l such as Denmark. It's the process of layering plant stalks on top of each other to create a weatherproof roof, helping to keep water out and heat in . It's a very old method of roofing and also convenient if you're construct ing homes in countries where lack of resource or funds may limit the use of hard roofing. The plants used can include rushes, reed and straw, which ar e then carefully and skillfully installed using age old techniques with exc ellent results. Thatch can be easily incorporated into new builds, adding a traditional charm that tile just can't accomplish.
well, not sure about easily. You need a very steep roof pitch, fireproofing measures, and only one type of electrical cable should be run near the roo f. Then there's the fact that thatchers are very few now, and the ones work ing are typically booked up for many months, delaying building works expens ively. And of course they dont come cheaply.
Then there's the fire risk & insurance issue...
===Membrane Roofing=Membrane roofing is the perfect roofing solution for flat roofs,
hardly!
as the material is very light compared to clay tiles or slate and can also be completely sealed across the surface keeping water out. It's a popular c hoice
none of that makes it perfect
for large commercial buildings with flat roofs but also domestic premises. Many older terraced homes have a kitchen or bathroom at the rear with a fla t roof, which you may notice have membrane roofs. New builds also incorpora te it on garages and parts of the home that have only one level. There are numerous types of membrane materials including Synthetic Rubber and Modifie d Bitumen. The one thing they have in common is that each piece is complete ly sealed together creating one large waterproof surface area.
No, some are, some arent.
===Slate=Slate roofing works along the same kind of lines and standard roofing tiles , the main difference being that they are completely flat and not curved fo r interlocking. This is due to the slate being naturally sourced piece by p iece and not forged by hand.
the reason is something entirely different
The downside to this is that slate can be very expensive but there are man y upsides to make up for the price. Slate is naturally fireproof
all the main residential roofcoverings except felt are
and very low maintenance, as it is 100% naturally formed, so it naturally p uts up with the elements.
waffle
Slate also has a very long life span and of course can be very attractive to look at, making it ideal for modern, traditional and also commercial bui ldings.
Its cost makes it far from ideal for commercial buildings, hence is usually not used for such app
It is very fragile, so always seek professional installers to avoid potenti al wastage.
on a diy wiki :)
===Asphalt Shingle=While we were busy finishing our homes with clay tiles, thatch and slate in the early 20th century, our American friends across the pond were busy inv enting a cheaper means to protect their homes. This was eventually invented in the form of Asphalt Shingle, which was a success due to its low product ion cost.
I understood that tarred paper roofs were in use here before then
Creation involves one of two bases, one fiberglass and one organic.
more specifically, card
A number of ingredients are then added to the mix giving each shingle prote ction from damaging UV light
bitumen & fillers eg chalk
and special treatment, so they don't stick together.
stone chippings etc
These materials can include ceramic granules and vitrified brick, which al so adds to the colour and once attached not only perform well against moist ure and sunlight but also very strong winds.
they're short lived, bend up & blow off in high winds...
This article was written by: our friends at www.topseal.co.uk
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 04 Nov 2014 10:52:20 -0800, meow2222 wrote:

<big snip>

Flat roofing and low pitch (less that 15 degrees pitch) various kinds of metal sheeting or chip board covered in fibreglass.
Metal roofing is not mentioned anywhere, despite being quite fashionable in some finishes.
The article could do with some serious modification :-)
Cheers
Dave R
--
Windows 8.1 on PCSpecialist box

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 04/11/2014 18:52, snipped-for-privacy@care2.com wrote:

I think one ought to encourage new authors of content on the wiki, rather than rely on the same few contributors. Part of that encouragement requires a "light touch" when it comes to editing, rather than disembowelling on first site ;-)
While this is certainly not the strongest article on the site, there are plenty weaker!

Might be handy if you make it clear which are your comments... Let me adjust the quoting for you.

So what is the most popular roofing in the UK?
While most new build will use concrete tiles, most properties are not new builds.

What would you prefer?

--
Cheers,

John.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, November 4, 2014 7:28:22 PM UTC, John Rumm wrote:

That's why I brought it up here instead.

Concrete, followed by slate.

felt roofs are probably the least perfect of them all. Metal roofing lasts longer.
NT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 04/11/2014 23:30, snipped-for-privacy@care2.com wrote:

New builds perhaps (and then fibre re-enfirced slate look alike probably trumps real slate there as well) - but existing housing stock all over the southeast is very heavily dominated by clay.

Membrane roofing also includes fibreglass, and rubber coatings which last very well.
--
Cheers,

John.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wednesday, November 5, 2014 11:23:09 AM UTC, John Rumm wrote:

No, its not. Some places are mainly concrete, some mainly slate. In many towns & cities clay is a minority. Clay is just one of the big players.

Indeed. But mostly its felt, and felt does not make anything like the perfect roofing solution.
NT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 04/11/2014 19:28, John Rumm wrote:

I would have thought that slate is a very good contender. It certainly dominated the roofs where I lived in London and in Glasgow.
--
Colin Bignell

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yeah, my perception is that while clay tiles can be locally common and became the common alternative to thatch in many areas, slate became the dominant roofing material with the industrial revolution and the growth of towns and cities. And continued to be so until concrete tiles arrived on the scene.
--
Chris French


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 04/11/2014 18:52, snipped-for-privacy@care2.com wrote:

No mention of stone tiles which are used widely in many areas, either natural stone or more recently, imitation stone tiles.
<http://www.stoneroof.org.uk/england.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.