Which Floor tile adhesive?

I'm about to tile a kitchen floor (green chipboard) with ceramic tiles. The floor was previously covered with vinyl that was very well stuck-down with something like evo-stik. Will the regular flexible adhesives for floor tiles adhere to old evo-stik or do I need something special?
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Hope you're also re-enforcing the floor as I don't reckon ordinary chipboard is rigid enough for ceramic tiles.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On 25/04/2014 15:35, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

I did the bathroom and shower room quite a few years go and they've been fine, but I guess the kitchen sees much more use. It seems that 6mm Hardie Backer or no-more-ply boards would solve both problems so I'll do some more investigating.
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On 25/04/14 15:35, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

It is IF its braced on siund joists
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Throw it out with the chipboard & replace with very well braced plywood.
Jim K
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On 25/04/14 16:25, JimK wrote:

Nothing wrong with chip - just as stiff as ply - but well braced is the key.
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Pal has a chipboard floor laid on polystyrene over concrete. Had it tiled using the correct adhesive. Several broke.
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More usually a concrete raft.
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On 25/04/14 15:21, Biggles@flies_undone.com wrote:

nothing wrong with the chip but the glue is an issue
I found tiling costs with decent tiles and cement in the £20-£30 a sq meter range.
At that sort of price I would STRONGLY recommend you rip up the chip and lay fresh.
That also gives you the option of adding more support for the floor - any flexing will make for loss and or cracked tiles.
Herring bone struts help a lot.
Or, if you have the depth, add another layer of chip or something else on top.
My point will be spending a LOT on a quality finish and that even with flexible tile adhesive you will get cracking unless the floor is pretty rigid.
So don't try and save a few hundred quid using old chip covered in glue. You probably could rough it up but why take the risk?
Lift that chip and lay side by side beams and herringbone strut the thing, and then put down new chip and use quality flexible adhesive or a good fast setter - I've used ardurit - and then do a pukka job on the expensive tiles.
Flexible adhesive is a bodge to get round a crap floor. Make a good floor and you wont need it.
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On 25/04/14 15:21, Biggles@flies_undone.com wrote:

Personally I'd overboard or replace the chip with 18mm WBP ply.
Then the correct adhesive is a cementious tile adhesive with Class S2 flexibility plus a flexible grout.
Look at BAL and Mapei adhesives - some are Class S2 as as, some have an additive liquid that can be added to vanilla powered adhesive to get the flexibility required.
Please understand that "flexible" != rubber. It adds just enough "give" to allow the very slight flexing of 18mm ply to not cause problems. You still need a basically solid and unmoving substrate - chip would be too chancy for my liking.
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+1 what Tim said.
Chip + damp from wherever = weetabix
Jim K
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On 25/04/14 22:19, JimK wrote:

in ten years wet tiles no penetration.

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So a sample of one ?!?
YMMV
Jim K
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On Saturday, April 26, 2014 11:02:05 AM UTC+1, The Natural Philosopher wrot e:

I had tiles on chip once. They were fine for 15 years, then all went t-ts u p as water penetrated hairline cracks in the grout and the chipboard expand ed. I repaired it twice then gave up on it - its an awkward repair scraping the chip down without debonding more tiles.
Tiles done properly should last a lifetime.
NT
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On 27/04/14 10:55, snipped-for-privacy@care2.com wrote:

the key is to prep properly first. The FIRST tiles I laid on that floor were too thin and not enough cement and poorly grouted and a leaking loo did n fact cause the chip to bubble. I ripped em up, laid the new ones carefully with tiles up the wall as well and some silicone at the wall/edge junction FIRST so that if it did crack there there was still a seal..
It has survived my wife leaving the bath running and totally flooding the bathroom,landing carpet, the hall and utility room underneath and destroying a smoke alarm (must replace that) and tripping the entire house.
That chip will take a soaking, just not a persistent leak.
I had one of those too - but it wasn't direct ON the tiles. It was under the basin in a cupboard..
they survived that, too.

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On Sunday, April 27, 2014 8:02:36 PM UTC+1, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

wrote:

ts up as water penetrated hairline cracks in the grout and the chipboard ex panded. I repaired it twice then gave up on it - its an awkward repair scra ping the chip down without debonding more tiles.

that's not the key at all. Chip flexes, its inevitable. Flexing a rock hard ceramic layer even the tiniest bit cant help but form microcracks, its jus t a question of when. Then water penetration if in a wet area is inevitable , and all grades of chip go the same way when wetted.
If you want a quick job to sell a house, it'll do. If you want the tiles to last for life, tile on chip hasnt a prayer, if it encounters anything wett er than a squeezed out cloth.
NT
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On 29/04/2014 23:24, snipped-for-privacy@care2.com wrote:

Whilst not necessarily disagreeing, I recently tried soaking green chipboard for several days and 'twas totally unaffected. Based on that experiment it's hard to believe that there is a problem with casual and occasional wetting of green chipboard.
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On 30/04/14 00:09, Biggles@flies_undone.com wrote:

There isn't, but persistent soaking especially from a cut edge will cause it to bubble,. The good news is it shrinks back once dry.
Some of the comments on here remind me of the 'plumber' who installed my hot water tank.
"What type is it?" "Mains pressure" "Oh OK so no header?" "no" "where's it going?" "IN the loft"
Nods sagely...
"Good idea, you will get a faster flow from up there" "On a MAINS PRESSURE TANK!!!"!?" "Yeah mate".
Then there was the case of the Underfloor heating. I spent several weeks with a heating engineer checking over the calcs and making sure it all was according to spec,. we laid it and still the carpenters said "its all right for background, but you should have some radiators. It won't heat the whole room you know "
Well after it was screeded we finally got the boiler in, and without a thermostat I let it run flat out all night.
The next morning "Jesus, its stuffy in here, what have you been doing?" "testing the underfloor heating...."
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On 30/04/2014 00:09, Biggles@flies_undone.com wrote:

+1
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On 29/04/14 23:24, snipped-for-privacy@care2.com wrote:

my experience shows you are talking out of your arse
even concrete floors flex. The key is that ceramic tiles too can flex and so can THIK beds of adhesive.
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