Underwater path construction

I really need to build a path to my workshop... finding a bit of lawn to walk over that is not rapidly turning into a replica of something similar to the Somme is getting difficult. Only problem is, in this weather it seems like a bit of a non starter (some bits of lawn are under a couple of inches of standing water).
I thought about ordering the slabs that I will ultimately use now, and just laying them in place for the moment until the weather permits a proper job to be done, but can anyone think of any other temporary path solutions?
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On Tuesday 28 January 2014 14:36 John Rumm wrote in uk.d-i-y:

I think lobbing the slabs down will be the easiest. They tend to bed down fairly quickly on soft ground and when you want to do it right (TM) half the materials are in the right place :)
Or duckboards for the authentic Somme look...
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Pallets, perhaps?
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Bailey bridge :-?
Can't think of anything better than your slab idea. For a less obtrusive solution you could use inset circular slabs as stepping stones, avail at nominal cost from B&Q.
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On 28/01/2014 14:45, fred wrote:

If the water/mud is really deep then, rather than a single path of slabs, place two slabs on top of each other as stepping stones with gaps in between?
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"John Rumm" wrote in message

Duck boards (ie slats on longitudinals) would be the conventional solution as you can prop them up if levels rise
Andrew
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I have a sample of one of a ladder with a builder's plank laid on top of the rungs working to keep feet out mud. But it mucks up the underlying water meadow no end. And IMLE a bit too narrow to navigate in the dark after drink has been taken.
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On 28/01/2014 14:36, John Rumm wrote:

Cast a concrete path. Portland cement will set underwater and give you something to walk on. You can use it as a sub-base for the slab path later.
Alternatively, you can do what I did to avoid having to wade out to my garage in winter - raise the whole lawn by about six inches.
Colin Bignell
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Nightjar wrote:

Why didn't you lower the drainage by the same amount?
Bill
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On 28/01/2014 20:56, Bill Wright wrote:

It was easier to raise my lawn than to change the winter water table.
Colin Bignell
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A raft? grin... Brian
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John Rumm wrote :

Plastic mesh fencing laid over the heavily used areas. It spreads your weight and prevents you sinking in further.
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On 28/01/14 14:36, John Rumm wrote:

BTDTGTTS
what you need to do is this.
get a load of MOT TYPE 1 LIMESTONE and build the path to your shed with that at leas as high, if not higher than the existing flood level.
If its on a transverse slope put transverse drains across it.
That is ALL you need to do right now.
After that you can pave it, tarmac it gravel it or simply leave it to fill with dirt and grass grow over it. It matters not. You have a bit of permeable subsoil holding up your walkway that is higher than the flood level.
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On 28/01/2014 17:18, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

I did think of that, but then I have got to shift the Type 1, dig my foundation and stick it back again if I want the final finished path level to match the existing paths.
Not sure our soil really gets the "permeable" bit:
http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php?title=File:PermeableDrive.jpg
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John Rumm wrote:

I suddenly had this problem when a half completed job (a large excavated area) flooded to a depth of 3" and looked set to stay that way. I got some pallets and they were perfect.
Bill
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On 28/01/2014 14:36, John Rumm wrote:

Have no idea whether it would work, and probably has many problems, but I seem to remember that expanded polystyrene has been used for roads over boggy ground. Think just a bit of asphalt over the top is enough for light traffic.
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Rod

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On 28/01/2014 21:29, polygonum wrote:

The widening of the M60 from junctions 6 to 8 was done this way, so yes, I'm sure it'd be fine for a path!
SteveW
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The next time you drive under the shopping centre perched on top of the A1(M) Hatfield tunnel, consider that the whole thing is sitting on expanded polystyrene...
(Well, and some concrete pillars.)
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On 28/01/2014 21:29, polygonum wrote:

Just a thought, but ...ummm.... it might be a bit tricky to lay expanded polystyrene under a flood of water (rather than muddy land). Maybe put some slabs on top to hold it down...?
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On 29/01/2014 22:42, GMM wrote:

Yes - I was trying to get my head around how best to use EP. Think you are right, simply putting down some EP then a layer of paving slabs on top would be the easiest and best?
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