Treating old wooden window frames

Treating old wooden window frames - we have some oldish window frames where pain flakes off fairly quickly when applied. The house was built 1970's, to a not terribly good standard. I assume the frames are treated softwood, because there's no rot, but the surface of the wood has dried out and is all grainy. Hence, the paint goes on, but does not last. All the other houses in the road have plastic double glazing. Is this a hint?
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On 24/07/15 09:20, GB wrote:

I've found aluminium primer quite good in the situation.
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Clearly it was a S&M dungeon at one time.

Unlikely unless you are into minimal maintenance.
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Sandpaper is your friend...
Jim K
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Depends on how intimate you get with it.
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On 24/07/2015 11:37, Rod Speed wrote:

IME wood hardener is what you need. Fibreglass resin is cheap enough in Halfords and works well as long as the wood is dry. There are probably sophisticated epoxy systems too.
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On 24/07/2015 14:02, stuart noble wrote:

There are. Thin, runny, brushable epoxy.
Wooden boats are usually epoxy coated from new, works much better than primer.
Andy
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On Fri, 24 Jul 2015 09:20:22 +0100, GB wrote:

Not an expert painter, but I would have thought that if the paint flakes off then the wood has not been properly cleaned, primed and undercoated.
Paint should stick to wood if the wood is clean and dry when painted.
Is it possible that the frame is hardwood?
In which case I think it will need a different (aluminium?) primer.
You can also get a primer/filler which will fill in the grain - but wood which is not smooth should still take paint, so I suspect that there is another reason that the paint isn't sticking.
Cheers
Dave R
--
Windows 8.1 on PCSpecialist box

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It probably just needs a god sand to get it down to good wood, it sounds like the wood has weathered where it keeps flaking off.
--
Chris French


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On 26/07/2015 20:38, Chris French wrote:

It's the old story of the solvent being sucked into the wood so that the paint cannot form a proper film. IME wood hardener is the answer. If you've done the hard work to get back to bare wood, it really is a no brainer. Not sure about the "new" breed of one pack wood hardeners. They appear to be based on moisture curing resins but I would always have more faith in a 2 pack system
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